Newsnight Season 2011

Season 2011

Newsnight Season 2011

First Air Date: January 01, 0001

First Aired on    :   1
Episodes    :   140 episodes



Episodes

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2011x196 14/10/2011 (October 14, 2011)


The news that Liam Fox has resigned as defence secretary has changed our plans for the programme. We will no longer be running a piece on how proposed changes to planning regulations might affect urban areas and speaking to Lord Rogers about this issue. Instead the whole programme is devoted to Dr Fox's resignation, the events that led up to it, the questions that remain and where this leaves the government. We will have analysis from our Defence editor Mark Urban and reporters David Grossman and Richard Watson. And we will be joined on the programme by guests including shadow defence secretary Jim Murphy, former head of the British Army General Sir Mike Jackson, and journalists Fraser Nelson and Miranda Green.


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2011x195 13/10/2011 (October 13, 2010)


The independent watchdog for health and social care says a fifth of NHS hospitals are breaking the law, when it comes to properly feeding and treating elderly patients. The Care Quality Commission visited 100 hospitals, and found cause for concern at more than half of them. Tonight we examine what was said and how much of this a reflection of how the elderly are treated in Britain more generally. Peter Marshall has a report looking into who are the backers who raised funds to pay for Adam Werritty to act as Defence Secretary Liam Fox's adviser, and David Grossman will have the latest developments on the story. We have a live interview with former Barnsley MP Eric Illsley who was jailed for expenses fraud. Susan Watts reports on the new obesity strategy for England in which the government has tried to stress the importance of personal responsibility. And we have a report on how garments labelled "designed in Scotland" and sold by UK high street chain Edinburgh Woollen Mill are actually being made by North Korean labour in Mongolian factories.


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2011x194 12/10/2011 (October 12, 2010)


UK unemployment has risen to a 17-year high of 2.57 million, according to official figures. Tonight Joe Lynam will give us his take on those figures, the Eurozone crisis and Barroso's plan. Jeremy will be joined by former Belgian PM Guy Verhofstadt and editor-in-chief at The Economist, John Micklethwait. Jonny Dymond will be asking members of the Mormon Church how they think they are viewed by the rest of the United States, and asseses the likelihood that one of their faithful could be elected the next president. And ahead of the start of Lord Justice Leveson's inquiry on phone hacking, Steve Coogan will join us live in the studio. That and more at 2230 on BBC Two.


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2011x193 11/10/2011 (October 11, 2011)


David Cameron says he wants his to be "the greenest government ever", but last week Chancellor George Osborne sparked anger among environmentalists when he told the Conservative Party conference the UK would cut emissions no faster than others in Europe, and environmental measures would not be taken at the expense of British business. And MPs on the Environmental Audit Committee have warned today that the government's "schizophrenic attitude" to climate change is undermining investor confidence in low-carbon industries. Tonight Susan Watts examines whether the green agenda is being watered down and we will debate the issues in the studio. US "supercop" Bill Bratton, who has gained a reputation for introducing bold measures to reduce crime in New York, Boston and Los Angeles, is in London to take part in a government conference on how to tackle riots and disorder and has given us an interview. We report on the jailing of former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko for seven years, whom a judge ruled had criminally exceeded her powers when she signed a gas deal with Russia in 2009. Mrs Tymoshenko said the charges were politically motivated. And the EU said it was disappointed with the verdict, and that Kiev's handling of the case risked deep implications for its hopes of EU integration. Plus, Stephen Smith has been to talk to former Oasis guitarist Noel Gallagher about the Manchester riots, the coalition and the passing of Cool Britannia.


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2011x192 10/10/2011 (October 10, 2011)


Defence Secretary Liam Fox has told MPs that he met his friend Adam Werritty 22 times at the Ministry of Defence and 18 times on foreign trips. Mr Fox also said that Mr Werritty, who has no government role or national security clearance, had not been involved in defence procurement issues. Tonight, we'll examine whether the Defence Secretary is guilty of impropriety or simply made some minor errors of judgement. Following the violence which killed twenty-four people at a rally of Coptic Christians in Cairo at the weekend, Tim Whewell will ask if attacks against Christians in Egypt are becoming worse in post-revolutionary Egypt, and if so why. You can watch one of Tim's previous reports on this from Cairo here. And Rory Cellan Jones has a fascinating film about whether the education system in England and Wales is failing to produce enough polymaths and top flight computer programmers who could one day emulate the likes of Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg. Watch a preview clip here. We'll also be joined by the Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries, Ed Vaizey.


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2011x191 07/10/2011 (October 07, 2011)


Moody's has downgraded the credit rating of 12 UK financial firms including Lloyds TSB, RBS, Nationwide and Santander UK amid concerns that the government is now less likely to support some firms if they get into trouble. Moody's also downgraded nine Portuguese banks, blaming financial weakness. Tonight Andrew Verity reports on the significance of this news and whether the belief that the days of UK government bank bail outs are over is correct. We will also be getting further analysis by studio by guests. And Stephen Smith has a fresh Citizen Smith report. He's had an exclusive look the first wave of community organisers who are meant to build David Cameron's big society and we talk to Civil Society Minister Nick Hurd.


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2011x190 06/10/2011 (October 06, 2011)


The Bank of England has said it will inject a further £75bn into the economy through quantitative easing (QE), the first time it has added to its QE programme since 2009. Tonight Paul Mason will take us through the details of what is happening, why it is happening now and how the Bank hope it to aid the fragile economic recovery. With the BBC announcing that it is planning to cut 2,000 jobs and radically change programming in order to cut 20% from its budget over the next five years, Stephen Smith will report on the wider cultural impact of a shrinking Auntie. We look at the impact of the work done by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who has died at the age of 56 from pancreatic cancer. And we have a report from Mark Easton on mixed race Britain including some exclusive new stats which show that the numbers of people in Britain who are mixed-race is actually much higher than previously thought.


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2011x189 05/10/2011 (October 05, 2011)


David Cameron re-wrote his conference speech at the last minute to omit a call on households to pay off their credit cards. Tonight Newsnight picks through the detail of what stayed in and asks whether his appeal for a can-do optimism at an anxious time for the economy is likely to be heeded. Paul Mason reports on talk of a concerted move to beef up balance sheets of struggling European banks, what is needed and what is likely to happen. We have a strong Lyse Doucet film from inside Syria about the current nature of the anti-government protests. Plus Jeremy talks to musician Brian Eno about art and music in an age of turbulence./


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2011x188 04/10/2011 (October 04, 2011)


Jeremy is in Manchester tonight with all the action and analysis from the third day of the Conservative Party conference. There has been a bit of a catflap over human rights, is it the Tories' claws four moment? (Sorry....) We'll have the annual conference season interview with the Mayor of London (you can re-watch the interviews from 2009, and 2010 here). This year Jeremy asks Boris if he'd consider standing for Parliament while serving as Mayor, and is offered a hand from Boris should he ever decide to give up his day job presenting Newsnight and run for leader of the Conservative party. And Jeremy will be joined by an audience of 70 Conservative women to discuss the reasons for the government's worsening polling with woman, and to work out what more the Conservatives could do to appeal to women.


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2011x187 03/10/2011 (October 03, 2011)


Tonight's programme will come from the Tory party conference in Manchester, where Jeremy Paxman will be joined by an audience of conference attendees. Jeremy will be speaking to MPs Philip Hammond, David Davis and Don Foster. Also we'll be getting the journalist's view of the conference from Fraser Nelson and Kevin Maguire. The main topic for discussion will be the economy and Chancellor George Osborne's big speech today and David Grossman will be giving his analysis of what the chancellor said. Plus Iain Watson will be looking at the European economic crisis amid the news that Greece is likely to miss targets to cut its budget deficit. And as the government announces that it is going to invest £50m to commercialise graphene - a carbon allotrope invented at Manchester University - we ask what is it and why is it important?


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2011x186 30/09/2011 (September 30, 2011)


In our final edition of the week, Andrew Verity will be asking what if anything is wrong with the predatory capitalism that Ed Miliband called for a clampdown on at the Labour Party's conference earlier this week. Tim Whewell will have more on the news that US-born suspected al-Qaeda leader Anwar al-Awlaki, whose death was said to have been personally ordered by US President Barack Obama, has been killed in Yemen. And as Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito's appeal against their convictions for the 2007 murder of Perugia student Meredith Kercher draws to a close we ask what the obsession with Knox is and has it got anything to do with Berlusconi's Italy.


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2011x185 29/09/2011 (September 29, 2011)


A large majority in Germany's parliament has approved new powers for the EU's main bailout fund, despite opposition from some members of the ruling coalition. Peter Marshall is in Berlin getting under the skin of what the Germans really think about Europe and the euro, and we will be discussing the latest events in the studio. We look at the wider implications of footballer Rio Ferdinand losing a High Court privacy action over a "kiss and tell" newspaper story. We have a live interview with actor Mark Rylance about the stunning success of the play Jerusalem as it returns to London from an award-winning run on Broadway - and what it tells us about being English. Plus, as Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah overturns a court ruling sentencing a woman to 10 lashes for breaking a ban on female drivers we ask whether he can win the battle against the hardliners in his kingdom.


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2011x184 28/09/2011 (September 28, 2011)


On tonight's Newsnight Paul Mason will be asking whether Europe and the world banking system is on the edge of catastrophe. He'll look at fears that the so-called rescue plan for the eurozone is already in trouble and will consider what would happen if the euro ultimately broke up. We'll be joined by the European Commission, Johanna Kyrklund from Shroders, economist and former DG of the CBI Sir Richard Lambert, and Peter Oborne from the Daily Telegraph to debate if the euro project is worth saving. We have a film about social breakdown amid austerity in Greece, and we'll hear from our correspondent Peter Marshall in Berlin - where Chancellor Angela Merkel faces a vote tomorrow that threatens to weaken her politically and undermine her ability to manage the debt crisis. Plus we'll have an interview with Labour leader Ed Miliband.


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2011x183 27/09/2011 (September 27, 2011)


Kirsty will be joined by a live studio audience at the Labour Conference in Liverpool tonight, where their leader Ed Miliband delivered a speech earlier in which he slammed big bankers, consensus politics, energy companies and benefit cheats. He said for decades our economy and society had been based on the wrong values. David Grossman will give us his analysis of Ed Miliband's performance later. And in light of John Prescott's comments on last night's programme that Ed Miliband should get rid of anyone who is "not pulling their weight", we'll consider if its time for a shadow cabinet reshuffle, and who might go.


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2011x182 26/09/2011 (September 26, 2011)


Tonight Paul Mason will have the latest on the eurozone rescue plan, which is reported to be taking shape in Washington, analysis of what it means, the timetable and the likelihood that it will work. And we will be joined by a fantastic cast of financial experts giving us their analysis. At the Labour party conference in Liverpool Iain Watson will focus on how the party can become economically credible again. We aren't speaking to Ed Balls as said earlier, but we will be talking to shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander. Plus David Grossman will be asking what the Labour party is for these days, and Jeremy Paxman will be taking up that theme with Lord Prescott.


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2011x181 23/09/2011 (September 23, 2011)


Our Economics editor Paul Mason has just arrived back from Greece, and tonight he will have the latest on the economic crisis both there and further afield. Plus we will be asking why, unlike in 2009, there is no sign of global leaders coming together to deal with the problem and opting instead for "kicking the can down the road". Mark Urban will be picking over Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas' decision to present the Palestinians' bid for statehood at the UN later today, despite a US promise to veto the move in the Security Council. And Susan Watts will have more on the experiment results which are baffling scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider, that appear to show subatomic particles known as neutrinos have exceeded the speed of light.


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2011x180 22/09/2011 (September 22, 2011)


There's quite a lot of sport planned for this evening's Newsnight, including from the BBC's Sports Editor David Bond who'll be telling us five ways competitors could cheat at the 2012 Olympics. Then we'll be joined live by Olympic champion and anti-corruption campaigner Michael Johnson. Gavin will be meeting the Russian oligarch who bank rolls the Independent and Evening Standard newspapers, Alexander Lebedev. And our Diplomatic editor Mark Urban will be watching David Cameron's intervention speech at the UN later.


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2011x179 21/09/2011 (September 21, 2011)


Tonight Iain Watson is doing our lead story on growth and will be asking if the government is wobbling on Plan A, and if the governor of the Bank of England and other central bankers might ride to the rescue. Then we have an update on an investigation from last month which uncovered evidence that the Ethiopian government is using billions of dollars of development aid as a tool for political oppression. You can read more about our initial investigation here. Now Newsnight has heard from members of the Ethiopian diaspora that there's been a concerted government backlash. We'll be hearing from the International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell. Prime Minister David Cameron has written to the National Trust to try to reassure its members who are campaigning against proposed changes to planning laws - the biggest reforms of the rules since the 1930s. Tim Whewell reports from rural Northamptonshire for us tonight, where a German-owned electricity firm has proposed building seven 410-foot (125m) wind turbines. And we'll be joined by leading businessman and peer Lord Wolfson.


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2011x178 20/09/2011 (September 20, 2011)


Paul Mason is in Athens today. Tonight he will bring us the latest on the crisis in the eurozone and Greek attempts to avoid a debt default. We will also be asking whether a default is inevitable and if so why leaders aren't setting out a plan for handling it, rather than continuing down the current path. The Liberal Democrat conference is continuing today and we will have an interview with Energy Secretary Chris Huhne. Plus Iain Watson will be looking at what the Lib Dems think now about the role Britain should play in Europe, and in dealing with the eurozone economic crisis. David Grossman will report on the tribes that make up the Liberal Democrat membership and look ahead to leader Nick Clegg's speech tomorrow. And documentarian Michael Cockerell, whose latest series The Secret World of Whitehall broadcast this month, will report for us on the allegations that an aide Education Secretary Michael Gove used a personal email account to circumvent freedom of information laws.


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2011x177 19/09/2011 (September 19, 2011)


Tonight's Newsnight comes live from Birmingham where the Liberal Democrats' 2011 conference is in full swing. Iain Watson will be reporting from the marginal seat of Birmingham Yardley where he's asking if the Lib Dems are facing electoral meltdown, David Grossman will be auditing exactly what the party has achieved in government so far, and Jeremy will be speaking to the Business Secretary Vince Cable.


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2011x176 16/09/2011 (September 16, 2011)


Last night on Newsnight former chancellor Ken Clarke said that political leadership in Washington and Western Europe has suffered "paralysis" in the face of the financial crisis. Tonight Mark Urban will be taking a closer look at this claim, assessing what is causing the inertia and its consequences. The Guardian newspaper has said that the Metropolitan Police are seeking an order under the Official Secrets Act to force it to disclose the confidential sources of its reports on the News of the World phone hacking scandal - we will have the latest on that. And Susan Watts reports on an extraordinary trial in the earthquake-hit town of L'Aquila in Italy in which science itself seemed to be on trial as seismologists are charged with manslaughter for failing to predict the 2009 quake in which more than 300 people died.


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2011x175 15/09/2011 (September 15, 2011)


Ministry of Justice (MoJ) figures show that a quarter of those charged over last month's riots had committed more than 10 past offences, while three-quarters had a previous caution or conviction. Tonight we have an interview with Ken Clarke about the link between re-offending and the unrest and what the justice minister thinks needs to be done. IMF chief Christine Lagarde has warned of a "dangerous" new economic phase in which bold, collective action is needed to prevent the major economies slipping back. Paul Mason will have full analysis of that and the latest on the crisis in the eurozone ahead of Friday's meeting of European finance ministers in Poland, which US Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner is also due to attend. And we have an authored film from one-time "Cameron Cutie" Charlotte Vere on whether the Tories are anti-women. Afterwards she and Angela Eagle will join Gavin in the studio to discuss.


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2011x174 14/09/2011 (September 14, 2011)


The leaders of Greece, France and Germany will have a phone conference this evening as they seek to find a way to contain the spiralling debt crisis in the eurozone. Tonight Paul Mason will explain what a Greek default might look like - could it be orderly and managed or are we looking at a Lehman type event? You can read more of Paul's thoughts on that in his blog. As we learn that unemployment in the UK rose by 80,000 in the three months to July and unions schedule a nationwide day of strikes and demonstrations for 30 November in protest at changes to public sector pensions, David Grossman looks at the coalition's growth strategy. Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls and someone from government will join us live. And Tim Whewell has been investigating the assassination of General Abdul Fatah Younis in Libya at the height of the campaign against Colonel Gaddafi in late July. With the murder still unsolved, there is mounting anger among members of Younes' large and powerful tribe.


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2011x173 13/09/2011 (September 13, 2011)


German Chancellor Angela Merkel has sought to calm nerves over a possible Greek default, warning of a domino effect if Greece fails and exits the single currency. Tonight Paul Mason reports on whether Mrs Merkel's attempts to allay fears will work and what is likely to happen next in the eurozone. David Grossman reports from the Trades Unions Congress where Labour leader Ed Miliband has delivered a key note address in which he said despite public sector worker anger at cuts it was a "mistake" to strike while talks were going on, and was heckled in return. Mark Urban examines the Palestinian bid for statehood set to happen at the UN General Assembly, which gets under way today. And we speak to Richard Dawkins, evolutionary biologist and outspoken atheist, about the thinking behind his new book The Magic of Reality and his belief in the need to indoctrinate children with science rather than mythology.


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2011x172 09/09/2011 (September 09, 2011)


Tonight Kirsty Wark presents an hour-long special on the 10 years since the 9/11 terror attacks live from New York. We will be hearing from key US members of the Bush administration - former defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld and former Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff. Mark Urban has a film on the US response to the attacks and whether it was driven at times by a desire for revenge. And we discuss the events of 10 years ago and the effect on the decade which followed with guests including Carl Bernstein, Suzanne Vega, Christiane Amanpour and Fran Lebowitz.


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2011x171 08/09/2011 (September 08, 2011)


Is the tail wagging the dog? Tonight we assess the claim that the Liberal Democrats are exercising too much control over the government on a whole range of issues. We talk to former US Secretary of State Colin Powell in the Bush administration about 9/11 and its impact. We have a film from Security correspondent Gordon Corera on the way NYPD and the FBI has responded to terror threats in the years after the attacks on New York and Washington and accusations that they have engaged in entrapment tactics. And we have an interview with Cathy Wilson about her time as the wife of the serial killer Peter Tobin.


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2011x170 07/09/2011 (September 07, 2011)


Tonight we report on the growing global currency war, which escalated dramatically yesterday after Switzerland stepped in to weaken the franc in a bid to rid itself of "safe haven" status - how much of a threat is it and who has the political power to avert a crisis? Nadine Dorries talks about her failed bid to change the law on abortion counselling to stop abortion providers giving NHS-funded counselling to women. We speak to a young man who has been in the Syrian city of Homs, scene of some of the worst clashes between anti-government protesters and government forces, and who was shot during the unrest. Plus, how is popular culture being used to alter perceptions of Muslims? We have an interview with Dr Naif al-Mutawa, creator of The 99 - comic book superheroes based on Islamic culture and society. And Catrin Nye speaks to the creators of Canadian TV sitcom Little Mosque on the Prairie - described as The Cosby Show for Muslims. You can read her article about that here, and watch the full report at 10.30pm.


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2011x169 06/09/2011 (September 06, 2011)


Ken Clarke has blamed a "broken penal system" for the riots that erupted across England last month. Writing in the Guardian, he said the "hardcore" of those involved were known criminals whose behaviour had not been changed by previous punishments. Tonight Liz MacKean reports on whether the justice secretary's assessment is correct and what can be done. Also, former News of the World legal manager Tom Crone has told members of a House of Commons committee investigating the News of the World phone-hacking scandal that he was "certain" he told James Murdoch about an e-mail which indicated hacking at the paper went beyond one rogue reporter. In a previous Culture, Media and Sport Committee hearing, News Corp bosses Rupert and James Murdoch said they were not told of an email. And today James Murdoch has said that he stands by what he said. David Grossman will be assessing the discrepancies and whether they are likely to dim News Corporation shareholders' view of James Murdoch and his chances of one day becoming head of News Corporation. And Stephen Smith is looking at some of Britain's worst performing high streets, and with the help of retail adviser Mary Portas, assessing whether they can be saved and if we should even try.


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2011x168 05/09/2011 (September 05, 2011)


Tonight on Newsnight Richard Watson examines if Britain was turning a blind eye to maltreatment and colluding with the Gaddafi regime to arrange the rendition of Libyan terror suspects - the PM has said that allegations that MI6 was involved should be examined by an independent inquiry. Paul Mason will be asking if the IMF's managing-director, Christine Lagarde, was right when she said the global economic outlook had darkened suddenly over the summer, and Jeremy will be speaking to the former chancellor Alistair Darling. Then we'll be hearing from Murdo Fraser, the favourite to become the next leader of the Scottish Conservatives who reckons the only hope for the party to attract greater support in Scotland would be to split off from the UK party. And Tim Whewell has been meeting the high command of Libya's National Transitional Council.


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2011x167 02/09/2011 (September 02, 2011)


Tonight we look into the rendition claims made by a Libyan rebel military commander, which if true would suggest a closer than expected relationship between the US and ousted Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's regime. Abdel Hakim Belhaj claims he was tortured by CIA agents who suspected him of being an al-Qaeda terrorist and then handed by the Americans to Gaddafi's intelligence services. Peter Marshall will be reporting on that and we will be talking to Menzies Campbell and to Michael Sheuer, former head of the CIA's Bin Laden unit. We are looking at the draft emergency measures to relocate terror suspects under Tpims, terrorism prevention and investigation measures. The relocation powers had been ditched by the coalition, but under draft emergency legislation they could be brought back in exceptional circumstances. We will be talking to Hazel Blears and Tom Brake, co-chairman of the Liberal Democrat backbench committee on home affairs. And whatever happened to silly season that period of summer typified by the emergence of frivolous news stories in the media? Stephen Smith reports.


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2011x166 01/09/2011 (September 01, 2011)


Senior diplomats are meeting in Paris for a major international conference on Libya's future. What should that future look like, and will the National Transitional Council and international community's vision dovetail or not? Tonight Peter Marshall will bring us the latest from the Paris conference and Tim Whewell will report from Libya. We have a report from David Shukman on illnesses linked to the dust from the attacks on New York's World Trade Center on 11 September 2001, affecting thousands. Plus we look at government proposals to overhaul planning laws in order to jump-start the building industry and the economy, a major shake-up which green campaigners say will lead to a development free for all and a legacy of blighted landscapes and urban sprawl.


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2011x165 31/08/2011 (August 31, 2011)


Paul Mason will report on the shake-up of British banks, which government sources have indicated may not come into force for several years. David Grossman explains why the fifty per cent rate of income tax required of people earning more than £150,000 a year has illuminated the divisions within the coalition. We'll return to a story from last night's programme - about changes to abortion counselling services rules so that clinics which offer termination services do not also provide advice. Tonight Downing Street said "the discussions currently underway do not represent any moral shift in the government's approach to abortion as an issue". We'll debate the government's moral agenda and its commitment to social liberty. And Tom Heap visits Croatia, home to the richest cave fauna in Europe, which is under threat by pollution and development.


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2011x164 30/08/2011 (August 30, 2011)


Seven people have been shot dead by security forces during anti-government protests in Syria at the start of the festival of Eid al-Fitr, activists say. Our diplomatic editor Mark Urban will have the latest later. Tim Whewell is in Libya and has a film for us about nation building, which sees him haggling over the price of AK47s at a Benghazi gun market. Anna Adams examines the row over independent abortion counselling and who should do it. And Neil Bowdler considers if resomation, a body 'liquefaction' process, and promession, a method of freeze-drying corpses, could offer greener alternatives to burial and cremation. Read more about that here.


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2011x163 26/08/2011 (August 26, 2011)


Tonight we will have the latest on Libya from our correspondent Tim Whewell, who is currently in Benghazi, which for now remains home to the National Transitional Council's headquarters. And we will be speaking to the NTC's deputy leader Abdul Hafiz Ghoga live on the programme. Plus former Daily Telegraph editor Charles Moore has done an authored film for us in which he explains where he thinks the Conservatives are going wrong. Afterwards Danny Finkelstein and Noreena Hertz will discuss his conclusions. All of that, and our Economics editor Paul Mason in the presenter's chair for the first time - 10.30pm on BBC Two.


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2011x162 25/08/2011 (August 25, 2011)


"I was buzzing me, just smashing windows and police cars and stuff... a big massive buzz." Tonight we have a film from Donal MacIntyre who has been meeting some of the young men who took part in the recent Manchester riots. He finds them revelling in the memories of the time when they overturned the rule of law and made the streets their own. To discuss the film Kirsty be joined by a shopkeeper who was trapped in his store during the riots and had to be rescued by police, someone who knows the looters, and a politician. Meanwhile... another confusing day in Libya. The hunt for Col Gaddafi continues, although reports he was trapped in a building in Tripoli came to nothing. It is certainly clear that the Transitional Council are desperate for money. Tim Whewell is in Benghazi for us tonight and Kirsty will be speaking to the Foreign Secretary William Hague. And Madeleine Morris has been looking into new figures which suggest that net migration rose by 21% last year, with 239,000 more people arriving in the UK than those leaving.


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2011x161 24/08/2011 (August 24, 2011)


The situation in Libya remains chaotic with Tripoli seeing running battles between rebel fighters and Gaddafi loyalists, new Nato air strikes, and a defiant message from Colonel Gaddafi himself, whose whereabouts remain unknown. Tonight we will be making sense of what is happening and asking where Libya goes from here with reporters on the ground and experts in the studio. We will be asking how the National Transitional Council can properly establish itself as Libya's leadership with ousted leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi still at large. And what Nato's responsibilities towards Libya's recovery are. And we will take a wider look at whether the Arab Spring is likely to be good or bad news for women. Plus, Citizen Smith has been on National Citizen Service - David Cameron's training programme for 16-year-olds which is to be expanded in response to the recent riots. How effective will a universal programme be at combating the sort of problems we saw a few weeks ago? And how is it different from existing youth programmes, many of which have been facing cuts? Stephen Smith has been finding out.


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2011x160 23/08/2011 (August 23, 2011)


The battle for Tripoli seems to be in its final stages tonight, with rebels taking over Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's fortified compound in the city, one of the final areas under the Libyan leader's control. Tonight we are dedicating the whole programme to the day's events and asking what next for Libya? We will be hearing from key players and our reporters on the ground as we examine the prospects for the last pockets of pro-Gaddafi resistance being swiftly eradicated, for a peaceful transition of power once the fighting stops and what is likely to happen to Colonel Gaddafi - whose whereabouts is currently unknown. We will look back over more than 40 years of Gaddafi rule, asking if this should be a day for celebration or not, and forward to what kind of Libya we are likely to see without Gaddafi at the helm.


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2011x159 22/08/2011 (August 22, 2011)


Robin Denselow will have the latest on the battle for control of Tripoli, where troops loyal to Col Muammar Gaddafi are battling rebels. Gabriel Gatehouse will be analysing who the rebels' interim administration, the National Transitional Council (NTC), are and what their agenda is. We'll ask guests - including Lord Malloch-Brown and John Bolton - if the Libya conflict signals a rebirth of liberal interventionism. And Sarfraz Manzoor considers if English cricket is doing enough to integrate Asian players. Join Jeremy at 2230 on BBC Two for that, and more.


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2011x158 19/08/2011 (August 19, 2011)


Tonight we will be looking at the attack on the British Council office in the Afghan capital, Kabul, in which armed insurgents seized control of the compound for a number of hours, killing at least 12 people. Paul Mason will have more on the ongoing turmoil in the stock markets as concerns over the strength of the global economy and eurozone debt continue. And we will be speaking to author of The Black Swan Nassim Nicholas Taleb. Plus, is Sally Bercow's appearance on Celebrity Big Brother a bad thing, or should what she does not have any bearing on her husband John Bercow's role as Speaker? We will be joined by ex-I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here contestant Christine Hamilton and her husband Neil and Jacob Rees-Mogg to discuss.


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2011x157 18/08/2011 (August 18, 2011)


Stock markets have seen falls of about 5%, and some bank shares have plunged 10%, as the negative mood which has caused recent turmoil takes hold again. Paul Mason will have the latest news and analysis on that and we will be speaking to Jeffrey Sachs, who says we have been tripped up by globalisation. Caroline Hawley will report on the call from the leaders of the US, UK, France, Germany and EU for Syria's President Assad to step down over his suppression of protesters, and whether he is likely to heed them. Plus, many students hoping to go to university face an even more intense battle for places than usual as this is the last intake of students to English universities before the introduction of tuition fees of up to £9,000 a year in 2012. David Grossman reports on whether the government's changes - not just higher fees, but significant changes to the structure of the higher education in this country - really benefit young people and whether they will provide the skills the country needs? We have been to the Mossbourne Academy - a very successful school on the edge of the Mossbourne estate in Hackney, which was the backdrop to some of last weeks riots - and the school's head teacher, Sir Michael Wilshaw, will be joining the debate in our studio. And on the 20th anniversary of the 1991 Russian coup we have a Bridget Kendal film in which she talks to many of the key players including Mikhail Gorbachev.


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2011x156 17/08/2011 (August 17, 2011)


Tonight we lead on the surprise rise in UK unemployment, which rose in the three months to June, by 38,000 to 2.49 million, official figures show. We will be asking what is going wrong, the threat this poses and looking at measures aimed at reversing the situation, particularly enterprise zones. As we continue to analyse the fallout from last week's riots we have a report on recent unrest in Gloucester and will be taking another look at sentencing of those involved. Plus, why do some people seem to lead charmed lives? LSE academic Dr Catherine Hakim has written a book on the power of erotic capital which she says is at the heart of how we work, interact, make money and conduct our relationships. We will be speaking to the author and debating the issues she raises.


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2011x155 16/08/2011 (August 16, 2011)


MPs have today released a letter from a journalist jailed for phone hacking, former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman, alleging senior figures at the newspaper knew what was going on and struck a deal to stop him implicating the paper at trial. David Grossman will have all of the latest news on that story and we will be speaking to former deputy prime minister and hacking victim John Prescott, and former newspaper editor Paul Connew. Amid news that two men charged with inciting disorder via social networking site Facebook have each been jailed for four years we ask whether the courts are being too draconian in sentencing people connected to last week's riots, or whether this kind of sentencing is right and in fact overdue. Plus, across the world, slums are home to a billion people. The rich elite want the shanty towns cleared, but residents are surprisingly determined not to leave. Paul Mason has been to Estero de San Miguel, a slum in the Philippines capital Manila, to find out why.


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2011x154 15/08/2011 (August 15, 2011)


Tackling the "broken society" is back on the agenda following last week's riots. David Grossman reports tonight as Cameron and Miliband draw battle lines, and we'll be joined by David Willetts and Hilary Benn. Paul Mason considers the degree to which gangs can be blamed for the unrest. Madeleine Morris visits Berlin to ask how heavy a price the Germans are prepared to pay to save the euro - we hear from their Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle and will be joined by economist Joseph Stiglitz. And was Peter Oborne right when he wrote that the moral decay of our society is as bad at the top as it is at the bottom? We'll debate.


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2011x153 12/08/2011 (August 12, 2011)


David Grossman will be bringing us the news of the day and will be looking back at what's been a tumultuous week of rioting in English cities. Gavin Esler will be considering how damaged the fabric of Britain has been by the unrest. Stephen Smith will be looking at the foreign reaction to and coverage of the riots. And Emily will be joined in debate by magazine publisher Tyler Brûlé, Hong Kong entrepreneur Sir David Tang, and historian David Starkey.


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2011x152 11/08/2011 (August 11, 2011)


Tonight we will report on the emergency parliamentary session, which was called in response to the riots. Will the debate and the measures outlined by the prime minister bring us any closer to proper diagnosis of what went wrong, and how to ensure we don't see a repeat? David Grossman reports. Also we examine the role of parents and whether lack of discipline and family breakdown have been a factor in the unrest. We will chew over the week's events with our political panel.


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2011x151 10/08/2011 (August 10, 2011)


David Cameron said this morning that parts of Britain are not just broken but "sick". Tonight we will discuss whether he is right and if so what the medicine should be with Conservative co-chair Baroness Warsi and Hackney MP Diane Abbott. We will have the latest on the unrest in the West Midlands from Liz MacKean and what is happening in Manchester from Anna Adams. We will also be reporting on vigilante activity and will be examining what role gang culture has played in the disorder.


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2011x150 09/08/2011 (August 09, 2011)


Some 16,000 officers are policing London's streets after three days of violence, with rioters warned they will feel the "full force of the law". Tonight Liz Mackean we'll be asking who the kids are that are perpetrating the trouble, and try find out what their motives are. Then Iranian rapper Reveal co-founder of hip-hop group Poisonous Poets, Lyn Costello from Mothers Against Murder and Aggression, and media exec Kelvin Mackenzie, will join us to debate what we should do with the rioters. Iain Watson will be examining if a malaise in the police force and a lack of leadership have contributed to the unrest. And David Grossman will be considering if the Prime Minister - who returned to Britain this morning after cutting his summer break short - has completely misjudged the situation.


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2011x149 08/08/2011 (August 08, 2011)


Home Secretary Theresa May is meeting police chiefs about rioting in London with new violence erupting in Hackney. Skirmishes broke out between police and groups of young people in the area around Mare Street. Tonight Liz Mackean will bring us the latest, and will be considering what the origins of this unrest are and where it can go from here. Gavin will be joined in the studio by former London Mayor Ken Livingstone, Conservative Shaun Bailey, and a community leader from Tottenham. Later we'll be joined by broadcaster and columnist Darcus Howe to discuss if comparisons between these inner city riots and events that took place in the 1980s are useful or misleading. Then Andrew Verity will be asking what options remain for the West to avoid a double dip recession, and we'll be joined by German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle.


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2011x148 05/08/2011 (August 05, 2011)


Just five days ago, international investors were considering the possibility that the US government might default on its debt. That fear has now gone away, but it has been replaced by a fear that the world could be heading towards another credit crunch. Today instability on the stock markets continues, with sharp falls in the past 24 hours amid a crisis of confidence due to the eurozone debt crisis and concerns about weak recovery not only in the US but also in Europe.


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2011x147 04/08/2011 (August 04, 2011)


Newsnight tonight investigates allegations that billions of dollars of long-term development aid money is being used as a tool of political repression in Ethiopia. Andrew Verity will be asking if the West is heading for a second economic slump. And as the government's new e-petitions website crashes with people trying to sign a range of petitions including one calling for the return of capital punishment, we'll be asking if it is really time to reinstate the death penalty in the UK. Join Kirsty for all that and more at 2230 on BBC Two.


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2011x146 03/08/2011 (August 03, 2011)


Tonight, we will be leading on our exclusive report on fresh allegations of phone-hacking at Mirror Group Newspapers. Heather Mills has told the programme that in 2001 a senior Mirror Newspaper Group journalist admitted hacking voicemails left for her by Sir Paul McCartney. Newsnight has also learned that many other prominent people, including footballer Rio Ferdinand and TV presenter Ulrika Jonsson, also believe they were hacked by the Mirror group. You can read more about that story and listen to a clip of the Mills interview here. Mark Urban has a report on who is likely win control of the new Egypt in the parliamentary elections. Will it be the young liberals who led the campaign anti-Mubarak campaign in Tahrir Square, or Islamic groups and that relic of the old regime, the army? Andrew Verity has a report on how annual take home pay is dwindling in real terms. And Stephen Smith has been delving into the power of memory, with a bit of help from celebrated mnemonist Dominic O'Brien - who will be doing a memory challenge live on the programme.


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2011x145 02/08/2011 (August 02, 2011)


Syrian forces are pushing towards the centre of the town of Hama as they continue an offensive in which scores of people have died. Tim Whewell will bring us the latest tonight. Then we'll be asking how damaged President Barack Obama has been by the US debt crisis. Anna Adams has been investigating why many young women's cervical cancer tests are going unprocessed in England. And Lyse Doucet meets America's top military official, Admiral Mike Mullen, on his way home from what's expected to be his final visit to troops in Afghanistan and Iraq.


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2011x144 29/07/2011 (July 29, 2011)


Two newspapers have been fined a total of £68,000 for breaking the law when reporting the investigation into landscape architect Jo Yeates' killing, and eight have paid out for libel. Meanwhile, lawyers for the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire have issued a statement saying he "acted on the instructions of others". So why does anyone bother with newspapers anymore? On tonight's Newsnight, our Political editor Michael Crick reports on the state of the British tabloid press. And as US Republican leaders scramble to rescue their deficit-cutting bill hours after a vote on it stalled because of a revolt from members of their own party, we'll be joined by Sharron Angle, the Republican Senate Candidate for Nevada in 2010, and leading Tea Party figure.


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2011x143 28/07/2011 (July 28, 2011)


On tonight's programme, Paul Mason retraces the epic journey from the Oklahoma Dust Bowl to the Californian promised land taken by migrant workers the Joad family, which John Steinbeck described in his 1939 Great Depression novel The Grapes of Wrath. Paul's been finding out how it reflects the realities of America's current debt crisis. Read more here. General David Petraeus has been speaking to Newsnight about his time as Nato's commander in Afghanistan. The new Director of the CIA also talks to us about difficult recent relations between the US and Pakistan -- he tells Mark Urban both sides have "stepped back from the abyss after looking into it". Read more on Mark's blog. And Stephen Smith examines the research which claims that if you stay up to watch Newsnight after your partner has gone to bed, it's a sure sign your marriage is in trouble


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2011x142 27/07/2011 (July 27, 2011)


Tonight, we take another look at the situation in Libya. While Libyan rebels remain locked in battle with pro-Gaddafi forces, the UK steps up the pressure on Col Gaddafi by insisting all Libyan diplomats leave the UK. Former Labour cabinet minister James Purnell tells Newsnight that one of the reasons the Labour Party lost the last election was that their supporters no longer backed the welfare state. He's live in the studio later to discuss how the welfare system could be transformed. And could we be seeing the end of scientific testing on monkeys? [Spoiler Alert: No] We'll be discussing the issues.


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2011x141 26/07/2011 (July 26, 2011)


Growth in the UK economy slowed in the three months to 30 June, partly because of the extra bank holiday in April, and also due to some other one-off factors - including the Japanese tsunami. Chancellor George Osborne said the growth was good news, but Ed Balls accused him of choking the recovery. Tonight Paul Mason will give us his analysis, and David Grossman will explain the politics. Then, with a year to go until the 2012 Olympics, Peter Marshall visits the Olympic Park site in east London to find out if pledges that were made to win London the event - including leaving behind a lasting physical legacy and inspiring two million people to take up sport and physical activity - will be fulfilled. Then author Iain Sinclair, who is sceptical about the London project, explains his feelings about London 2012. And we'll be joined by the athlete turned ambassador who led London's bid, Lord Coe, and by the Welsh athlete and TV presenter Baroness Grey-Thompson.


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2011x140 25/07/2011 (July 25, 2011)


Norwegian police are investigating claims by Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted carrying out Friday's twin attacks in Norway, that he has "two more cells" working with him. Steve Rosenberg is in Oslo for us, and we'll be exploring how deeply ingrained the anti-immigrant strain of thinking is in Europe. Then Catrin Nye examines the links between Breivik and the English Defence League (EDL). Jeremy Paxman will be joined live by the EDL's leader Tommy Robinson. And Paul Mason travels to the north east of England to hear a "mea culpa" from former business secretary Lord Mandelson, who admits New Labour didn't get everything right on the economy when they were in office. Lord Mandelson will join Jeremy live in the studio to explain how he thinks Labour needs to change in order to win back power.


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2011x139 22/07/2011 (July 22, 2011)


Coming up at 2230 on BBC Two, new allegations about phone hacking at a weekend tabloid - which suggests illegal practices weren't just rife at the News of the World. We'll have the latest from the Norwegian capital where at least two people have been killed by a huge bomb blast, while reports say a gunman has opened fire at a Labour Party youth camp in Norway. Mark Urban has been to meet US General David Petraeus who acted as the US commander in both Afghanistan and Iraq and who is expected to take over as the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency in September. In a wide-ranging interview he talks about the drawdown in Afghanistan and the significance of the death of Obama Bin Laden. And Stephen Smith has been lunching with art historian Dr James Fox and muse Sue Tilley at Lucian Freud's favourite restaurant in Kensington. Stephen asks if Freud, who died at his London home on Wednesday, was the last great British painter.


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2011x138 21/07/2011 (July 21, 2011)


German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy have hammered out a common position on the euro debt crisis ahead of a crunch meeting of eurozone leaders today. Details of the deal have not yet been released, but there are indications that a new tax on Europe's banks to help fund any new aid packages may NOT be part of the deal. Mark Urban is in Brussels for Newsnight - don't miss his report on the Euro Summit in tonight's programme.


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2011x137 20/07/2011 (July 20, 2011)


Prime Minister David Cameron has said that "with hindsight" he would not have hired ex-News of the World editor Andy Coulson as his communications director. Our Political editor Michael Crick has been blogging about the links between Coulson and the top Tory triumvirate of Cameron, Osborne and Hague, and you can hear more from Michael and David Grossman on the political events of the day later tonight. Then we'll be asking Max Mosley, who won a privacy case against the News of the World after it exposed his sadomasochistic sex life, and celebrity publicist Max Clifford if this is the moment the British press changes. And Rory Cellan-Jones will be considering if there is a case for high speed rail.


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2011x136 19/07/2011 (July 19, 2011)


Rupert Murdoch has said he was "appalled and ashamed" to learn that the phone of Milly Dowler had been hacked by the News of the World while being questioned by MPs alongside his son James this afternoon. We've also heard Sir Paul Stephenson - the outgoing commissioner of the Met police - give his evidence to the home affairs committee today, and will watching when former NI exec Rebekah Brooks appears shortly. On tonight's programme we'll be analysing what we learned from today's hearings and will be considering what future the News International empire has.


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2011x135 18/07/2011 (July 18, 2011)


The fallout from the phone hacking scandal continues and tonight we'll have the very latest on the events of the day. Met Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates has quit amid growing pressure - we'll examine why he had to go and ask if public and political confidence in the police is now at an all-time low. David Cameron is cutting short his trip to Africa to return to the UK and he's announced that the Commons will be recalled on Wednesday to debate the latest developments. How damaged is the PM? And is there now a scenario that could lead to Cameron losing his job? All that and a look ahead to tomorrow's crucial culture select committee hearing with Rebekah Brooks, and James and Rupert Murdoch.


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2011x134 14/07/2011 (July 14, 2011)


Tonight on Newsnight with Kirsty Wark we have an exclusive interview with His Royal Highness Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud - the second biggest investor in News Corporation. David Grossman will be taking us through the events of the day. Tim Whewell has a report on how the contagion of the Murdoch brand is spreading around the world, and particularly to the US. And we will be discussing whether this phone-hacking scandal will accelerate the demise of newspapers, or blow over.


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2011x133 13/07/2011 (July 13, 2011)


Jeremy Paxman will be joined tonight by a live studio audience, all of whom describe themselves as 'undecided voters'. He'll be asking them their views on the business of phone-hacking and how they think the party leaders have been dealing with recent revelations.


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2011x132 12/07/2011 (July 12, 2011)


More on the hacking story tonight, as senior Metropolitan police officers tell MPs News International deliberately tried to thwart the original investigation into phone hacking. Also Paul Mason reports on a day of volatile European shares as investors worry that the eurozone debt crisis could spread to Italy and Spain. Plus we look at the government's energy policy as Energy Secretary Chris Huhne publishes a White Paper with plans for £110bn of investment in electricity generation under which a quarter of the country's power stations would be replaced by 2030. And Liz MacKean looks at what lies behind the upsurge in violence in Northern Ireland.


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2011x131 11/07/2011 (July 11, 2011)


Another day of fast moving developments on the News of the World hacking story as Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt says he is seeking fresh advice from regulators on News Corp's takeover bid for BSkyB. And the has BBC learned there is evidence the News of the World (NoW) was paying a Metropolitan Police Royal Protection Squad officer for the contact details of senior members of the royal family, their friends and their relations. We will have the latest tonight and reports from Michael Crick on the political ramifications, from David Grossman on whether this is the moment the political classes break away from the Murdoch empire and Richard Watson on the police's part in the affair. All that and a report from Fifa World Cup host country Qatar by BBC Sports editor David Bond. You can read more about that in David's blog.


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2011x130 08/07/2011 (July 08, 2011)


On Newsnight tonight we ask if this is a watershed moment for British journalism with guests including writer Will Self, Heat magazine's Boyd Hilton, MumsNet co-founder Justine Roberts, former BBC director general Greg Dyke and Harriet Harman MP.


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2011x129 07/07/2011 (July 07, 2011)


This Sunday's issue of the News of the World will be the last edition of the paper, News International has said. Will the bombshell announced today by James Murdoch assuage public anger? Will it remove the threat that the phone hacking scandal might scupper News Corporation's bid to take full control of satellite broadcaster BSkyB? Will The Sun newspaper now become a seven-day-a-week operation? Has the whole affair inflicted permanent damage on Rupert Murdoch's media empire? On tonight's programme we will put those questions to key players, get reaction from Wapping, analyse the fast-paced events of the day and bring you the very latest news. And, as Nasa prepares for the last ever space shuttle mission, Susan Watts has travelled to California's Mojave desert to meet the entrepreneurs preparing to take up the challenge of human space flight, now that the space agency is stepping aside.


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2011x128 06/07/2011 (July 06, 2011)


Are the News of the World phone hacking allegations the equivalent for journalists of the MPs expenses scandal and a watershed moment for the profession in this country? Prime Minister David Cameron has promised a public inquiry after a police investigation ends - but Labour says it must happen sooner. Michael Crick and Richard Watson will have the latest on the story and we will be joined by guests to discuss. We have a piece on how Britain is slipping behind other countries in the fight against child sex abuse. Plus Jeremy will be talking to Professor Martin Seligman, the American psychologist whose work inspired the prime minister's plan to measure the nation's happiness. Apparently, "happiness is out, flourishing is in" - but is this the sort of thing governments should be getting involved in?


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2011x127 05/07/2011 (May 07, 2011)


Tonight on Newsnight, Richard Watson has new information on the latest hacking allegations being laid at the News of the World's door. We will be discussing the story and its fallout with former tabloid editor Alastair Campbell and News of the World insider Paul McMullan. Then talking about the future of newspapers will be Huffington Post chief Arianna Huffington and the new editor of The Independent Chris Blackhurst. Justin Rowlatt reports on what the loss of 1,400 jobs at train maker Bombardier says about the British approach to manufacturing and procurement deals, and about the Coalition's growth strategy. And Paul Mason has a strong film about Pathfinder housing scheme in Stoke-on-Trent, part of John Prescott's grand regeneration plan, and the devastating consequences of cutting funding for it.


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2011x126 Scottish Independence (July 04, 2011)


In a special edition of Newsnight tonight we're exploring different attitudes towards the notions of Britishness and national identity, and to Scottish independence. We'll analyse the findings of a survey which found that almost 50% of voters in England want Scotland to remain part of the UK - read the rest of the findings here. Allan Little will consider the role of the British state in the Scotland he grew up in and why there has been a gradual decay of what it means to be British in Scotland. And Fergal Keane examines why the concepts of Englishness and Britishness are hard to disentangle, and asks if the rise of Scotland's nationalism might inspire a new distinctly English nationalism among those who once saw themselves as British.


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2011x125 01/07/2011 (July 01, 2011)


On the day that the Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari meets Prime Minister David Cameron, Richard Watson considers how secure Pakistan's nuclear weapons are - and whether the US might take pre-emptive steps to stop them falling into the hands of terrorists. We'll be joined by the Pakistani High Commissioner to Britain, Wajid Shamsul Hasan. Former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn has been released from house arrest amid doubts about the credibility of his accuser. We'll ask if he could still be a candidate for the French presidency - leading American lawyer Alan Dershowitz and DSK's biographer Michel Taubmann will discuss. And we're keeping a close eye on the tennis - is Andy Murray's dream of a Wimbledon final dying?


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2011x124 30/06/2011 (June 30, 2011)


Hundreds of thousands of public sector workers have gone on strike across the UK over planned pension changes. Tonight David Grossman, who has been out on the streets of London with protesters, examines the proposals for public service pensions and we'll hear from the government, Unions and the Labour Party. Meanwhile, Anna Adams has spent the day in Kent hearing from parents, pupils and teachers about how today's one day strike has affected them. Then we'll take a brief look at the history of British industrial disputes, and discuss what the political consequences of more strikes are likely to be with our political panel. And Sue Lloyd Roberts has another report for us from Syria - this time about how the revolution there kicked off and what role cyber activism played in it.


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2011x123 29/06/2011 (June 29, 2011)


Greek MPs have voted in favour of unpopular austerity measures aimed at saving the country from defaulting on its debt. So is that the end of the crisis? Our economics editor Paul Mason assesses the likely outcome as protests continue on the street. Read Paul's blog. And while Greece is preparing for some major belt tightening, the European Union is looking to ask its member states for more cash - going against the wishes of David Cameron who had called on the EU to exercise some belt tightening of its own. The UK Border Agency has been facing criticism after managing to let into the country a man who had been banned. It wasn't as if he sneaked in. Sheikh Salah, who has Israeli citizenship and is the leader of the Islamic Movement in Israel, arrived under his own name and his visit had been announced in advance. He went on to address public meetings before the police arrested him. Richard Watson will have a report for us. And our political editor Michael Crick is in Inverclyde ahead of Thursday's by-election. The seat has traditionally been held by Labour but after the SNP's success in the Scottish Parliament elections, Alex Salmond's party is hoping to pull off a win. Michael will bring us the latest as the campaign ends.


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2011x122 28/06/2011 (June 28, 2011)


A planned shake-up of higher education in England, being set out to MPs, aims to increase competition and give consumer powers to students. We'll speak to the Universities Minister David Willetts about that later. Police have fired tear gas in running battles with stone-throwing youths in Athens, where a 48-hour general strike is being held against a parliamentary vote on tough austerity measures. Paul Mason is there and we'll get the latest from him tonight. Meanwhile, you can read his thoughts on his blog. Then Mark Urban considers what went wrong with the project to upgrade the Kajaki dam in Helmand Province that was supposed to bring electricity to millions of Afghans. A quest into which lives and money have been poured, the turbine remains unassembled, exposed to the elements and overgrown with weeds, three years after being brought to the site by the British military. Read more here. And Johann Hari, interviewer and columnist with the Independent, has admitted inserting quotes into his interviews that were not from the original interview itself. We'll be discussing if that's plagiarism - or harmless journalistic sleight of hand .


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2011x121 27/06/2011 (June 27, 2011)


Tonight David Grossman will be asking where public opinion is on the planned strikes over pensions that are due to take place on Thursday, when teachers and civil servants are due to walk out causing widespread disruption. Then we have front-line reportage from Andrew Harding who is in the besieged city of Misrata in Libya. As Liam Fox vows to bring budgets "under control" at the Ministry of Defence in an overhaul likely to see a cut in the number of senior officers, Mark Urban explains what the reorganisation might like look like. And Matt Frei delivers his valedictory essay for Newsnight in which he asks if the US is in long term decline, and we discuss if the 21st Century might really be the Chinese century.


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2011x120 24/06/2011 (June 24, 2011)


Tonight, we have an exclusive with hacking collective LulzSec, who have been explaining their agenda to Susan Watts. And off the back of that piece we will be talking to former US head of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff and James Lyne - a computer expert who hacks for security companies to test their security. Tim Whewell has an update on our story this week that Syrians protesting against the Assad regime in London say they have been intimidated by officials from their home country. Plus, what does the news that home furnishings retailer Habitat has gone into administration, with only three British stores assured of survival, say about Britain's sense of style today? We will be speaking to designer and Habitat's former style director Tom Dixon and the Editor of Elle Decoration Magazine, Michelle Ogundehin. And Michael Crick is still in Brussels where European Union leaders have gathered for a second day of summit talks dominated by the Greek debt crisis, which is threatening the stability of the 17-nation eurozone. UK Prime Minister David Cameron said today that he had received assurances that Britain would not be called upon to contribute to EU financial support for Greece. Tonight Michael will ask if this is the moment that Britain should redefine its relationship with Brussels and the Union.


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2011x119 23/06/2011 (June 23, 2011)


Michael Crick is in Brussels for us tonight where the threat of a Greek debt default undermining the euro is overshadowing an EU summit. Paul Mason will be asking how an economy like Greece's can be saved from going bust (read more on his blog), and we'll be speaking to Werner Hoyer, the German Foreign Office's Europe Minister. And Iain Watson has the latest on the attempt to ban the use of wild animals in circuses in England.


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2011x118 22/06/2011 (June 22, 2011)


Tonight we'll be hearing testimony from the British Syrian commnunity who say that protesters outside the embassy in London are being threatened, as are their family members back at home in Syria. We go undercover for an investigation into a group of faith healers who claim they have miracle cures for cancer and HIV. And Iain Watson has the latest on the House of Lords reforms.


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2011x117 21/06/2011 (June 21, 2011)


Tonight Sue Lloyd-Roberts goes undercover in the Syrian capital Damascus to speak to opposition activists there about the anti-government protests, the regime's response and what the demonstrators hope to achieve. Then our Economics editor Paul Mason considers if the likelihood of banking contagion if Greece defaults has been overblown. Amid claims of a government U-turn Michael Crick is looking at sentencing, and technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones asks if the personalisation of the web could limit our access to information, enclosing us in a self-reinforcing world view and making our social circles more homogeneous.


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2011x116 20/06/2011 (June 20, 2011)


Tonight on the programme we have an exclusive report from inside Syria by one of our reporters, who has just returned from a week undercover in the capital Damascus spent meeting opposition activists who are leading the anti-government protests. We hear powerful testimony about what is really happening on the ground in Syria's revolution. Michael Crick will have the latest on government plans to make women wait longer for their state pension. And we ask if we are living in an over sexualised society, and if so whether that is necessarily a problem. Are double standards in the media to blame? Should the government be intervening, or do we need a new kind of feminism to respond? Our guests include Caitlin Moran, whose new book, How To Be a Woman, attempts to reclaim feminism in a deliberately non-academic way, Brooke Magnanti, author of the call girl blog Belle du Jour, and Kat Banyard, author of The Equality Illusion and founder of UK Feminista - an organisation supporting grassroots feminist activism.


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2011x115 17/06/2011 (June 17, 2011)


Paul Mason is still in Greece this morning and is out and about gauging response to Prime Minister George Papandreou's attempt to push through unpopular austerity measures demanded by the EU through the appointment of a new finance minister. We will have his film tonight and also by the time we go to air Paul should be back with us and live on the programme with a report on how worried the rest of the eurozone and the UK should be by the crisis. Also, with a photograph of a couple kissing amid the Vancouver riots, we ask what it takes to make an iconic image.


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2011x114 16/06/2011 (June 16, 2011)


Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou is set to announce a new cabinet amid tough austerity measures, as MPs from his party convene an emergency meeting. Will this be enough to ease the fears that Greece will default on its debt which have shaken markets and to end the unrest on the streets? Paul Mason is in Athens and will bring us the latest tonight. We will also be looking at the promotion of Ayman al-Zawahiri to al-Qaeda leader and reports from the US the Sun is entering a period of "hibernation" with far fewer sunspots than had been expected. And we have a film on the influential work of Collier Campbell; the award-winning textile design company which turns 50 this year.


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2011x113 15/06/2011 (June 15, 2011)


Which will have a bigger impact on the 21st Century, the global financial crisis or the Arab Spring? And can the events even be separated out? Tonight we look at both events. We have an interview with Nato Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, as concern at the international community's failure to make a breakthrough in the Libyan conflict looks to be growing. We will also be talking to Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague, who has again ruled out military intervention to protect Syrian civilians of the kind recently undertaken in Libya. Paul Mason is on the frontline of the financial crisis - today's austerity protests in Athens. You can read his reports in his blog - and tonight he will be live on the programme. And we will be discussing links between the Arab Spring and financial crisis with Black Swan author Nassim Nicholas Taleb and economist and writer Noreena Hertz. And then it is time for something completely different as we turn our attention to the lunar eclipse - the first total lunar eclipse of 2011 and the longest in nearly 11 years - with amateur astronomer and professional Brian Cox impersonator Jon Culshaw and space scientist Maggie Aderin Pocock.


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2011x112 14/06/2011 (June 14, 2011)


The government has agreed to make the main changes to its controversial NHS reforms in England that were recommended by an independent review. David Cameron said ministers had listened to fears about increased competition and more powers for GPs and would now slow the pace of change. Tonight we look at what is left of the bold, radical plan for reform that Health Secretary Andrew Lansley was convinced existed as recently as January, and we will ask him how he feels about the changes. Also, as the government admits it cannot force councils in England to provide weekly bin collections, we look at the tension between the centralised and devolved government. And Stephen Smith has been to Belgium to see Big Society in action on a grand scale in Brussels, where volunteers of every stripe take part in an annual city clean-up day.


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2011x111 13/06/2011 (June 13, 2011)


Microsoft tycoon Bill Gates has pledged $1bn to help vaccinate children around the world against preventable diseases like pneumonia. He's hosting a summit in London where countries are being asked to give an extra £2.3bn ($3.7bn) by 2015 for child vaccines. We speak to Mr Gates about his plans and hear from those who disagree with his approach.


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2011x110 10/06/2011 (June 10, 2011)


Tonight we'll be looking at the future of the Labour Party under Ed Miliband. How is he shaping up as a leader and what are his plans for the party? Leaked documents which detail efforts by Gordon Brown and his allies to speed up Tony Blair's exit from office after the 2005 election have emerged, reminding us of former divisions in the party. Can Ed Miliband unify his troops and outline a convincing vision for Labour? We'll hear from a senior ally of Ed Miliband and we'll be speaking to Arnie Graf, the US community organiser and mentor of the young Barack Obama, who's been appointed by Mr Miliband to conduct a review of Labour's organisation and campaign structures. How can Labour learn from community activism in the US? We'll also be discussing whether the death knell has sounded for Nato after outgoing US Defence Secretary Robert Gates said it faced a dim, if not dismal future. Plus the latest on Sarah Palin's emails that are being released by the state of Alaska.


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2011x109 09/06/2011 (June 09, 2011)


The Crown Prosecution Service has launched an independent inquiry following Newsnight's revelations last night that they didn't disclose material which might have saved people from convictions. It follows Richard Watson's investigation showing how the CPS broke its own rules on disclosure of evidence in the case of six activists accused of planning to shut down a Nottinghamshire power station in 2009. The group had been infiltrated by a police informer Mark Kennedy. Religion and Politics - The Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, has written a devastating critique of the coalition's performance in government - even questioning the strength of their mandate, arguing: "with remarkable speed, we are being committed to radical, long term policies for which no one voted". We'll ask cabinet minister Iain Duncan Smith if Rowan Williams is right in what he says and who has the moral high ground in this debate. We also have a very strong film from Tim Whewell in Gaza on the Arab spring. The desire for change is strong but there seems to be no means to deliver it.


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2011x108 08/06/2011 (June 08, 2011)


Richard Watson has the latest on the story that the Crown Prosecution Service has opened an inquiry after claims prosecutors withheld undercover police officer Mark Kennedy's surveillance tapes from defence lawyers. Our economics editor Paul Mason will be asking what can we do about banks. Mark Urban will bring us the amazing story of the Syrian blogger, A Gay Girl in Damascus, who is missing. And Stephen Smith has been to meet iconoclastic choreographer Michael Clark whose latest work - which fills the Tate Modern's Turbine Hall - uses professional dancers alongside volunteering members of the public, and which Clark says embodies the punk spirit for which he first became famous.


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2011x107 07/06/2011 (June 07, 2010)


Tonight we're leading on NHS reforms and we'll be hearing from key players in the coalition and public and private health practitioners. Then we've done a Wife-Swap style parenting experiment in which a family who use strict "Chinese" style parenting methods switch mother with a family who have a more relaxed Western approach. And we'll be joined live by "Tiger Mother" author Amy Chua + Mumsnet co-founder Justine Roberts to discuss the merits of different parenting styles.


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2011x106 06/06/2011 (June 06, 2011)


The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has concluded that no changes are needed to UK economic policy. It said weak economic growth and rising inflation had been "unexpected", but said they were "largely temporary". It pointed to rising commodity prices and the increase in VAT as temporary problems for inflation. Our Economics editor Paul Mason has been blogging on this subject and you can watch more from him on tonight's programme, when we'll also have interviews with the interim boss of the IMF, John Lipsky (watch a clip here), and the shadow chancellor Ed Balls. Then, as Nintendo becomes the latest company to suffer an online security breach due to an attack by hackers, the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones investigates how much we put our own personal data at risk by storing it on servers and hard drives that are not our own. Read more on the dot.Rory blog here. Ahead of the publication tomorrow of the government's revised Prevent counter-terrorism strategy, the Home Secretary Theresa May has accused universities of "complacency" in tackling Islamist extremism. Richard Watson is in Nottingham and has more on this story for us this evening.


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2011x105 03/06/2011 (June 03, 2011)


Panorama's programme detailing the abuse of residents in a Bristol care home and the news that Southern Cross has slashed its rent payments in an effort to keep its 750 residential homes for the elderly running have this week thrown a new spotlight on the provision of care for vulnerable members of society. Tonight we focus on the kind of care which should be available and who should pay for it with a report from Peter Marshall and a discussion with guests including Joan Bakewell, John Redwood and Ray King from Bupa. We also focus on another of the stories of the week - morality in sport - following the news that the Bahrain Grand Prix has been reinstated. The race, originally due to be held on 13 March, was called off in February because of pro-democracy protests in which more than 20 people have died. Is it right that it will be back on the F1 calendar in October?


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2011x104 02/06/2011 (June 02, 2011)


With more doubts raised today on the government's ability to control immigration, one group who are being targeted are students who wish to study here. But can the UK afford to turn many of them away? Tonight we will debate whether the crackdown on student visas keeps the best and the brightest out, or simply closes one big immigration loophole. As the E-Coli bug claims more victims Susan Watts reports on how worried should we be about this new and powerful strain, and we talk to Professor Hugh Pennington, who led inquiries into two E-Coli outbreaks in the UK. And 1980s architecture - iconic buildings like London's Broadgate Centre and the Law Courts in Truro - is starting to turn 30. Love them or loathe them, this means they can now apply for listed heritage status. But should they be saved? Tonight we have an authored film from Wayne Hemingway on the proposed listing of iconic and controversial early '80s developments. Before you see that film, check out this classic piece of BBC archive we've uncovered of Prince Charles talking about 1980s architecture.


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2011x103 01/06/2011 (June 01, 2011)


Nato's Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen has said that Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's departure from power is "only a matter of time". Tonight we hear from the BBC's Andrew North who has spent the past few weeks in Tripoli. We have a film from our correspondent Tim Whewell who is in Egypt - where a court has set a date for the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak and his two sons, Alaa and Gamal. Tim has travelled to the Sinai peninsula, the wilderness area that separates Africa and Asia, which he finds is awash with arms and increasingly unstable since the uprising which toppled Mr Mubarak in February. Read more about that here. And Jeremy will be speaking to Booker prize winning author turned political campaigner, Arundhati Roy.


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2011x102 31/05/2011 (May 31, 2011)


The Football Association and the Scottish Football Association have called for Fifa to postpone its presidential election. Current president Sepp Blatter is the only candidate for the 1 June election after Mohamed Bin Hammam's withdrawal. Peter Marshall will have the latest on the Fifa crisis for us tonight. Justin Rowlatt visits the world's biggest polluter, China, to find out if it really can boom without poisoning the planet. Then David Grossman considers Angela Merkel's decision to phase out nuclear power stations in Germany by 2022. And as increasing numbers of people decide that property is now so scarce and its cost so high that they may never own their own place, Jeremy is joined by property expert Kirstie Allsopp to discuss how that possibility might change us.


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2011x101 27/05/2011 (May 27, 2011)


Sharon Shoesmith, the former director of children's services for Haringey, North London, has won her Court of Appeal battle over her sacking following the Baby Peter tragedy. Judges said that the-then education secretary Ed Balls and her employers, Haringey Council, had been "procedurally unfair" when they sacked her three years ago. Baby Peter Connelly, who had been seen 60 times by social services, was found dead in 2007 with over 50 injuries. Tonight we will talk to Ed Balls, and will discuss whether in the rush to find a scapegoat for the Baby Peter tragedy opportunities to reform social services were lost. Also amid the news that Fifa President Sepp Blatter has been placed under investigation by the organisation's ethics committee over accusations he failed to report the payment of alleged bribes we ask if this is the moment football cleans up.


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2011x100 26/05/2011 (May 26, 2011)


Tonight we lead on the news that Ratko Mladic, wanted for genocide during the Bosnian war in the 1990s, has been arrested in Serbia and that moves to extradite him to The Hague tribunal have begun. Gen Mladic, the most prominent Bosnian war crimes suspect at large since the arrest of Radovan Karadzic in 2008, faces charges over the massacre of at least 7,500 Bosnian Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica in 1995. What will his arrest mean for reconciliation in the country and region? And does it open the door to membership of the European Union for Serbia? Tonight our guests to discuss the matter include Serbian ambassador to the UK, Dr Dejan Popovic, Bosnian writer Zlata Filipovic, whose book Zlata's Diary chronicled the horrors of war in Sarajevo where she lived, and International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) prosecutor Sir Geoffrey Nice. Also, we have a film from Catrin Nye who has been to the Greater Manchester town of Oldham 10 years after riots between white and Asian communities. Despite efforts to bring the two communities together over the last decade she finds that many are still leading parallel lives, and some are predicting more conflict ahead. Afterwards we will be joined in the studio by people from Oldham to discuss the film's findings and what needs to change.


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2011x99 25/05/2011 (May 25, 2011)


Barack Obama and David Cameron have said Colonel Gaddafi will ultimately be forced out of power and Libya's people allowed to "choose their own future". At a joint press conference in London, the UK prime minister vowed to "turn up the heat" on the regime in Tripoli amid suggestions of deadlock on the ground. Tonight Mark Urban considers what the diplomatic strategy for Libya is now. Jeremy has been to meet the former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf. Jeremy asks him if he was surprised that the Al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden was found living inside Pakistan. See that interview in full later. As the coalition appoints pro-abstinence charity Life to an advisory group on sexual health, we'll debate if the government's Christian moral approach to sex education and abortion is a good thing or not. And Stephen Smith dons his scarlet matador's cape and travels to Spain where the Catalan parliament has banned the country's most emblematic pastime. Stephen finds that though the bullfighting ban has brought relief to animal rights activists, people are deeply concerned that an important part of the culture and tradition of Spain's nationalist heartland will be lost.


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2011x98 24/05/2011 (May 24, 2011)


President Barack Obama has met Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace at the start of his state visit to Britain. Later he will have a brief meeting with Prime Minister David Cameron, although their more substantive talks are scheduled for Wednesday. Tonight Mark Urban look at what will be topping the agenda at those talks and what both leaders will be hoping to achieve in them. Peter Marshall is focussed on Glencore which floated on the stock exchange today. He will be telling us more about this vast company - the world's largest diversified commodities trader - what it does and how it works. The ongoing fight by local communities to save their libraries will be shown in force tonight at Kensal Green, with writer Alan Bennett leading the charge. Stephen Smith is off to meet him. And we have an interview with porn baron Larry Flynt who will be talking about the connection between power and sex outlined in his new book One Nation Under Sex, a history of political sex scandals.


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2011x97 23/05/2011 (May 23, 2011)


An MP has defied the judiciary today by naming Ryan Giggs as the married footballer at the centre of a media gagging order. David Cameron has said that banning newspapers from naming such stars while the information was widely available on the internet was both "unsustainable" and "unfair" - but what is the answer? Are new laws required? Or can the press be trusted to regulate itself? Tonight we hear from the head of the Press Complaints Commission, the MP at the centre of the row, and a lawyer who has secured injunctions in the past. Then Justin Rowlatt reports from China on the difficulties men there are having finding partners if they do not first own property. Justin finds the situation is significantly impacting on the economy as men choose to save rather than splurge. And our Science editor Susan Watts is keeping an eye on the ash cloud from the Grimsvotn volcano in Iceland, which is expected to reach the UK by the early hours of Tuesday morning, the Met Office has said.


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2011x96 20/05/2011 (May 20, 2011)


Tonight, we lead on the news that a professional footballer has obtained a disclosure order against the social networking site Twitter. The application seeks the disclosure of the identities of a number of Twitter users who had been responsible for the publication of confidential information about him. Then we'll be looking into the story that the Rwandan government is masterminding an alleged assassination plot in this country against dissidents critical of the Rwandan regime. And as Dominique Strauss-Kahn is granted bail by a judge in New York after being formally charged with trying to rape a hotel maid, we'll consider who might be in line for his former job heading up the IMF.


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2011x95 19/05/2011 (May 19, 2011)


We learned today that the Coalition has decided against introducing a Privacy Act to address concerns about injunctions, and that hot topic of discussion, super injunctions. The decision became known on the day that an order granting anonymity to ex-Royal Bank of Scotland boss Sir Fred Goodwin was lifted at the High Court. The lifting was triggered by House of Lords member Lord Stoneham using parliamentary privilege to reveal details of the gag order to peers. Tonight will debate whether this is a good day for freedom of speech or a bad day for human rights with the man who forced the move, Lord Stoneham, with a former judge who has imposed injunctions and with Max Mosley who has been pushing for a tightening of the law to protect individuals' privacy. Mark Urban will be giving us his thoughts on President Barack Obama's speech on the Arab Spring and we will be hearing from Middle East Quartet representative Tony Blair. Tim Whewell reports from Cairo on how recent upheavals have upset all the old certainties in the region and how Egypt's approach to Israel, the peace process and regional alliances has changed. And following the row over Justice Secretary Ken Clark's remarks about rape yesterday, Liz MacKean will be considering if the law needs to take a completely different approach to the crime. And we will discuss whether Mr Clarke was right to say there are different types of rape with Deborah Orr who says there are and a rape victim counsellor who says he is wrong.


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2011x94 18/05/2011 (May 18, 2011)


Recent polling by Lord Ashcroft suggested that there is a growing rift between the Conservative party and the public on the issue of crime. Tonight we look at whether the outcry over Ken Clarke's comments about rape and the row over Theresa May's proposals to cut the police budget are the latest signs that the Conservatives are out of touch on law and order. Also, when David Cameron came into power he adopted a chairman style of leadership, giving his ministers a large dose of autonomy and not micro-managing every department - but is this approach now getting the coalition into difficulties and does he need to tighten his grip? Plus, we follow the story of a man who has voluntarily had an impaired hand amputated so he can be fitted with a bionic limb and we will be discussing elective amputations with a man who has been fitted with a similar prosthesis. And we speak to David Brooks, New York Times columnist and author of "The Social Animal", a current hot read in Whitehall.


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2011x93 17/05/2011 (May 17, 2011)


What would have happened if Osama Bin Laden had been captured rather than killed? Tonight we'll hear the case against Bin Laden, and we'll explore the different legal scenarios that could have ensued if the Al-Qaeda leader had been taken alive. We'll hear from advocates of each of the three scenarios what the pros and cons of each would be. Then we'll be joined live from Islamabad by Lyse Doucet who'll be asking if the US and Pakistan can successfully work together when there's little trust left between them. And our Diplomatic editor Mark Urban will join us live from Washington from where he'll explain why the current crisis in relations between the two countries is the most difficult since 9/11. Tonight's guests include Judge Michael Mukasey, US attorney general under President George W Bush (2007-9), and Benjamin Ferencz, the 91-year-old former prosecutor at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials.


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2011x92 16/05/2011 (May 16, 2011)


The head of the IMF, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, is appearing in court in New York to face charges of sexual assault. Mr Strauss-Kahn, who had been seen as a contender in France's 2012 presidential election, denies allegations that he tried to rape a hotel maid on Saturday. His appearance had been delayed for forensic tests to be carried out. Meanwhile, another allegation against Mr Strauss-Kahn has emerged. A French writer says she may file a complaint for an alleged sexual assault in 2002. Tonight Peter Marshall will consider what impact this news will have on the political and cultural life of France, and we'll be joined in debate by French commentators Esther Leneman and Agnes Poirier. Then Michael Crick will be asking if Lib Dem cabinet minister Chris Huhne is politically finished. A senior detective has been tasked with investigating claims he asked someone else to take his penalty points for a 2003 speeding offence, Essex Police say. And on the day when the first coded bomb threat warning outside Northern Ireland has been received in a decade, Liz Mackean reports on Queen Elizabeth II's visit to Dublin tomorrow, when she'll become the first monarch to set foot in the Republic since George V. We hope to be joined by Lord Major, the former prime minister credited with establishing the Northern Ireland Peace Process in the early 1990s.


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2011x91 13/05/2011 (May 13, 2011)


Every day this week there seems to have been a big story in the news about the relationship between openness and personal privacy. Tonight David Grossman will be investigating what we should be allowed to know, and we'll be joined by a panel of journalists, lawyers and others to debate privacy laws, super injunctions and Twitter revelations. Then historian and author of England's Mistress, Kate Williams will be doing an authored piece asking what all these sex scandals tell us about 21st Century sexual behaviour in Britain.


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2011x90 12/05/2011 (May 12, 2011)


Tonight on Newsnight we will be joined live in the studio by UK Chancellor George Osborne and French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde as we focus on the problems at the heart of the Eurozone. Our Economics editor Paul Mason will present his thesis on why EU governments and bureaucracy have mishandled the sovereign debt crisis, imposing unrealistic penalties on the population to save the banks in their own heartlands. And Paul will be giving us his thoughts on what Mr Osborne and Ms Lagarde tell us. We also have an interview with Kate and Gerry McCann, whose daughter disappeared while on a family holiday in Portugal four years ago, about the book Mrs McCann has written on their ordeal and ongoing efforts to locate Madeleine. Then our Science editor Susan Watts has the story of the secret US embassy cables released by Wikileaks which show nations are racing to "carve up" Arctic resources - oil, gas and even rubies - as the ice retreats (read more here). And Iain Watson has the latest on the news that the Lib Dem MP David Laws is to be suspended from the Commons for seven days over his expenses claims, which he used to pay rent to his partner and for building work and telephone bills.


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2011x89 11/05/2011 (May 11, 2011)


If it ever came to fruition we are still a long way from Scottish Independence, but if it did happen what would an independent Scotland look like? Jackie Long is digging through what the SNP has said in the past and will be reporting from Edinburgh tonight. Lyse Doucet has a film on the ambivalent attitude of Pakistanis towards Bin Laden. And we look at the phenomenon of Slut Walks - is this a wise response to the offensive comments of a Canadian policeman, and can the word "slut" be reclaimed? We will be discussing.


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2011x88 10/05/2011 (May 10, 2011)


Tomorrow marks the first anniversary since the UK coalition government came to power. Tonight, we look at how the relationship between the Conservative and Liberal Democrats is faring and what the strategy is for both parties now, one year on. Plus we'll be joined by some political elders in debate. Then we have a film from Finland where we've met Timo Soini, the leader of right-wing, anti-immigration, nationalist party the True Finns. Last month the party, which opposes EU bailouts, took nearly a fifth of votes in the country's general election. And we will be examining the impact of ex-motorsports boss Max Mosley's failed bid in the European Court of Human Rights to force newspapers to warn people before exposing their private lives, and Mr Mosley will be joining us on the programme.


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2011x87 09/05/2011 (May 09, 2011)


Nick Clegg has said that protecting the NHS is now his number one priority, claiming that "no bill is better than a bad bill". Meanwhile, one of his own MPs says the whole NHS reform exercise ought to be "stopped rather than paused". Tonight Michael Crick will be examining the politics of this - one of the most radical plans in the history of the health service - and Paul Mason will be asking if the opportunity to really reform the NHS has been lost for this generation. Stephen Smith goes in search of the flat white drinking, Guardian reading, progressive North London "commentariat" who voted 'yes' in last week's referendum on the alternative vote. Jeremy will be asking the former US assistant secretary of defence Joseph Nye what power is. And Will Gompertz meets film maker Terry Gilliam - the man who ran away from Minnesota to join Monty Python's Flying Circus - to find out how he got on with his operatic directorial debut, The Damnation of Faust for the ENO.


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2011x86 06/05/2011 (May 06, 2011)


In a special hour-long programme at 10.30pm, we'll be analysing the results of the UK local, Welsh, Scottish and AV polls. Our political editor Michael Crick will bring us the latest on the AV result which is still coming in, and will be assessing where heavy losses for the Lib Dems in England, significant wins for the SNP in Scotland, and the Conservatives holding ground in England all leaves British politics. David Grossman is in Bristol asking Lib Dem grassroots supporters how their party blew their big chance to get electoral reform, and what they should do now in coalition. Iain Watson reports from Edinburgh on the SNP's surge to Holyrood victory. And we'll be joined by Danny Finkelstein, Olly Grender and Peter Hyman to chew over the events of the day.


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2011x85 05/05/2011 (May 05, 2011)


We have the third in our series of extraordinary films on the 7/7 terror attacks in London, in which people caught up in the bombings recount how the attacks unfolded and changed their lives forever. If you missed Wednesday's film on the Edgware Road attack you can watch it here. Newsnight has an exclusive interview with a former colleague of the 7/7 bombers' leader, Mohammed Sidique Khan, which sheds new light on the crucial years before the bombings when he was living in Leeds. We'll also be examining the legality of the US operation that killed al-Qaeda head Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan. Could Britain have undertaken something similar? And voters across the UK are going to the polls in a series of national and local elections as well as a referendum to decide the way MPs are elected. We'll have a report from Scotland on the elections for the parliament and Michael Crick will take a look at the alternative vote referendum.


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2011x84 04/05/2011 (May 04, 2011)


We have the second in our series of extraordinary films on the 7/7 terror attacks in London, in which people caught up in the 7/7 terror bombings in London recount how the attacks unfolded. If you missed Tuesday's film on the Circle Line attack you can watch it here. On the eve of elections around the country we look at what is at stake for our political parties and who the winners and losers are likely to be. We will be taking a close look at the Egyptian-mediated reconciliation pact between rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas, asking what it means for the prospect of peace in the Middle East. Jeremy has an interview with new BBC Trust chairman Lord Patten. And with the debate about whether a picture of Osama Bin Laden's body should be released we ask why it is so important to see such pictures and look back at some of the famous images of fallen foes from Mussolini to Saddam Hussein.


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2011x83 03/05/2011 (May 03, 2011)


Tonight our Diplomatic editor Mark Urban will be asking where the killing of al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden by US forces leaves the war on terror. We'll speak live to George W Bush's Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff. We have the first in a series of films hearing testimony from people who were caught up in the 7/7 bombings in London in 2005, and we'll debate if there is now an increased risk of further terrorist attacks here in the UK following Bin Laden's death. Paul Mason is in Cairo and has been considering how the Arab Spring fits into the story. Where is the Arab world facing politically now and might a less brutal face of political Islam emerge? Read more on Paul's blog. Matt Frei is in Washington where he asks people how the extraordinary events of yesterday have changed the public perception of President Barack Obama and will it propel him to a second term? And Iain Watson reports on the confrontation between the energy secretary and the prime minister at a cabinet meeting over the No campaign's claims in the alternative vote referendum. George Osborne reportedly told Chris Huhne that the Cabinet was no place for a "Jeremy Paxman interview".


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2011x82 Royal Wedding Special (April 29, 2011)


Friday's nuptials may have meant an extra day off for many, but not for Kirsty Wark who will be presenting a royal wedding edition of Newsnight at our usual time of 10.30pm. Kirsty will be joined in the studio by guests Simon Schama, Will Self, Rowan Pelling, Plum Sykes and Nicky Haslam who will be discussing the events of the day and their impact. Does the wedding feel in tune with the current mood of the country, or hopelessly out of step? Has this been a welcome break from the atmosphere of austerity or an outrageous expense at a time of belt tightening? And what of the bride and groom? To what effect do William and Kate define Britishness today and what effect will they have on how the monarchy is viewed? All that and more will be up for debate. The programme kicks off with a report from Michael Crick who will have spent the day down at Buckingham Palace talking to the crowds who have gathered there. And Stephen Smith is heading to Gloucester to a neighbourhood which hosted a fantastic street party when Charles and Diana married in 1981, but which took some encouragement and help from Big Society organiser Citizen Smith to get in the party mood this time round.


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2011x81 28/04/2011 (April 28, 2011)


Tonight as President Obama reshuffles his cabinet we look at the implications for the Arab Spring. A battle over defence cuts is expected but if the main Western powers pull back from the region, what does that mean for the Arab world and the rest of us? We'll be talking to PJ Crowley, the former US state department spokesman about how sustainable Western involvement is. We'll have other guests too. We also have a film about Yemen where President Ali Abdullah Saleh has agreed to step down within 30 days. The US, worried about terrorism, has poured military aid into the country but it is claimed that some has been used by the country's leadership to repress any opposition. And ahead of the Royal Wedding, the American TV networks are getting ready for wall to wall coverage. Why are Americans so fascinated by the Royals?


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2011x64 01/04/2011 (April 01, 2011)


Tim Whewell has managed to secure a rare interview with the Libyan rebel leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil. He says they'll accept a ceasefire if Colonel Gaddafi pulls his troops out of Libyan cities under rebel control. But they will not back down on their demand that Colonel Gaddafi must go. As officials in Japan say the evacuation of residents near the quake-hit Fukushima nuclear plant will be long-term, we ask what the catastrophe means for nuclear power. We'll have the pro-nuclear environmental writer George Monbiot and Jeremy Leggett who is founder and Executive Chairman of Solarcentury which seeks to harness the power of the sun. Plus we'll have our Political Editor Michael Crick who has been with the Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg on the pro-AV campaign trail. How will the coalition cope with a referendum result going either way?


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2011x63 31/03/2011 (March 31, 2011)


We will take a closer look at Libyan Foreign Minister Moussa Koussa's decision to come to the UK - and at the man himself and role he played within the Gaddafi regime. Richard Watson will examine the possible benefits his defection will bring to the UK government and its allies, and the political and legal headaches too. Energy Secretary Chris Huhne and representatives of the oil and gas industry are meeting today to discuss the government's announcement in the Budget of a hike in taxes on the oil companies' windfall profits. Matt Prodger will report on that. Paul Mason will be taking us through the Irish bank stress test results, which will be released later today. And Stephen Smith's transformation into Big Society activist Citizen Smith finally begins today, having been pushed back in our schedule by the Libya conflict.


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2011x62 30/03/2011 (March 30, 2011)


Tim Whewell talks to General Suleiman Mahmoud of the Libyan rebel forces who tells him the rebels need weapons if they are to overthrow Colonel Gaddafi. He says with arms they could do the job in two weeks, but without it could take six months. The US President Barack Obama has said he does not rule out arming the rebels as government forces push them back. But any decision to supply arms to the rebels by the West would change the whole nature of the intervention. What would the implications be? We'll also be taking a close look at the arts and sciences. Which brings the most economic benefits to our society? We will have a film putting the case for each and a discussion with guests including Deborah Aydon, Executive Director of the Liverpool Everyman and Playhouse theatres and Imran Khan, Director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering in the UK And Ed Miliband is to marry in May. Why has he decided to tie the knot now ? And why will there be no best man (i.e. David) at his wedding?


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2011x61 29/03/2011 (March 29, 2011)


Strikes on Libya will continue until Col Gaddafi meets UN terms, stops attacking civilians and pulls back his forces, the US's Hillary Clinton has told the London conference of allied leaders. Tonight we'll talk to the Foreign Secretary William Hague. The London conference was intended to be a demonstration of unity but just how solid in reality is the coalition? Our Diplomatic Editor Mark Urban will bring us up to date with the day's events while out in Libya Tim Whewell will bring us a report from Derna, a town in the east from where more fighters went to join al-Qaeda in Iraq than anywhere else in the world. It highlights how little we know about the rebels and what could replace the Gaddafi regime. And our Science Editor Susan Watts will report on the latest CJD scare. Two separate incidents have emerged in which patients have been told they were put at risk of contracting the brain wasting disease - 38 patients have been warned in Wales and 21 in Essex. In both cases the fatal disease could have been picked up during surgery. Susan speaks to one of the patients affected and medical experts about the risk of contracting CJD from surgical instruments.


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2011x60 28/03/2011 (March 28, 2011)


As the rebels continue advancing west in Libya, our Diplomatic Editor Mark Urban will bring us up to date on the latest Coalition air raids that have hit Gaddafi's birthplace of Sirte, the next target for taking by the rebels. Meanwhile, Tim Whewell has been in the small city of Derna, which Gaddafi claimed was infiltrated with terrorists. He will bring us a report on what life is now like there for the people - many of who are enjoying a new liberation. We also have a fascinating film from Sue Lloyd-Roberts on how women are treated in Saudi Arabia. Sue looks at how women's freedom is restricted and how some are now quietly rebelling. And our Economics Editor Paul Mason looks at the aftermath of Saturday's protests in London against public spending cuts. Have we seen the end of the peaceful protest?


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2011x59 25/03/2011 (March 25, 2011)


We look at what the fresh unrest in Syria and Yemen and the ongoing conflict in Libya means for al-Qaeda and militant Islam, and what used to be called the war on terror, both in the short and long term. Will militant Islam be side-lined by the broadly secular nature of many of the North African and Middle East protests or will events like the bombing of Libya be a radicalising element which presents an opportunity to Islamists? Richard Watson will be reporting on this issue and in the studio we will be speaking to a senior ex-CIA adviser on al-Qaeda who knew Osama Bin Laden. Ahead of tomorrow's trades union anti-cuts march we have a report the policing of activists and on the plans of some protesters with no connections to the TUC. Plus Michael Crick will be reporting on why the rally could present a problem for Labour.


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2011x58 24/03/2011 (March 24, 2011)


Portugal's parliament has rejected an austerity budget, prompting the resignation of Prime Minister Jose Socrates. An international bail-out, similar to those accepted by Greece and the Irish Republic last year, now looks far more likely. We'll be asking what Portugal can do without a prime minister, and what the implications might be for Euro-zone members, particularly Germany. As fighting in Libya continues in key cities, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's tanks and artillery forces seem unstoppable, despite air strikes by international forces. How effective have the coalition forces been and how long might it take to stop Col Gaddafi's forces? And Matt Prodger has a report on the US soldier Bradley Manning, who is being held in solitary confinement in a US military prison - accused of leaking confidential documents to the Wikileaks website.


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2011x57 23/03/2011 (March 23, 2011)


Tonight's Newsnight will be on for a full hour - from 10.30pm to 11.30pm - as we pick over the details of what Chancellor George Osborne announced in today's Budget. Iain Watson and Michael Crick will be taking us through the key measures, the political calculations behind the figures and possible flashpoints. Paul Mason will be taking a wide view of the measures and giving us his analysis of whether it is as the chancellor claims a "Budget for growth". We will be speaking live in the studio to Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander, shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Angela Eagle, and the head of the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) Robert Chote. We will be assessing what kind of chancellor Mr Osborne is with former chancellor Lord Lamont and economists Ann Pettifor and Irwin Stelzer. And our Political Panel - Danny Finkelstein, Olly Grender and Peter Hyman - will be here to debate all that we have learned. Plus, following the news that actress Elizabeth Taylor has died, Stephen Smith will be looking back across her life on and off screen and we will be talking to fellow Oscar winner Julian Fellowes.


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2011x56 22/03/2011 (March 22, 2011)


Tonight's programme will, unsurprisingly, focus on the conflict in Libya. We'll look at tensions within the hastily assembled multi-national coalition, and examine why this is one conflict that America is keen not to be seen to lead. Elsewhere, we'll try to find out what the real story behind the continuing protests in Bahrain is. And finally, ahead of tomorrow's budget, as the retail price index measure of inflation reaches its highest level in 20 years and with real wages similar to 2005 levels - the last time real wages fell over six years was in the 1920s - what does this mean for social aspirations?


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2011x55 21/03/2011 (March 21, 2011)


Mark Urban reports on the strength of the coalition against Libya and who is doing what in the operation, and assesses whether Colonel Muammar Gaddafi is himself being targeted in the raids. We will be discussing the conflict with diplomat Sir Jeremy Greenstock and Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt. And Michael Crick will report on the Commons debate and vote on the UK's involvement in the military action. Tim Whewell has a report on the unrest and political turmoil in Yemen, and we will be speaking to the Yemeni ambassador to the UN who has resigned. Plus David Grossman has a report on energy costs, whether we are paying too much and Ofgem's proposals for shaking the industry up.


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2011x54 18/03/2011 (March 18, 2011)


The focus of the programme will be the Libya conflict. Events are moving fast following last night's UN Security Council resolution authorising all necessary measures to protect civilians from attacks by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi's forces. In the face of Western powers discussing how to enforce the no-fly zone, Libya's government has declared an immediate ceasefire, with Foreign Minister Mussa Kussa saying that it was intended "to protect civilians". Tonight, Mark Urban will be bringing us up to date on the latest military plans, Michael Crick will be giving us political analysis of David Cameron's role in pushing for action and we will be discussing the crisis with guests in the studio.


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2011x53 17/03/2011 (March 17, 2011)


A draft United Nations Security Council resolution is to be put to a vote in New York tonight. If adopted it would authorise a no-fly zone over Libya and allow Arab states and others in co-operation with the UN to protect Libyan civilians, including in the rebel-held city of Benghazi. We will have the result of that vote and be getting reaction from a close Clinton ally in the US. Susan Watts will be reporting on efforts to deal with the crisis at the tsunami-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, assessing what is happening on the ground and also what measures are being taken around the world. And with the events in Japan causing countries to reassess the safety of their own nuclear energy programmes, David Grossman looks at what this means for the prospects of an energy gap in Britain as we aim to meet electricity demands while also meeting deadlines to cut carbon emissions. Plus, remember Citizen Smith? Well he's back - not in the form of Robert Lindsay this time, but our correspondent Stephen Smith. Stephen has been to Big Society boot camp, undergoing training as a Big Society organiser ahead of the government's planned roll out this summer.


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2011x52 16/03/2011 (March 16, 2011)


The British Foreign Office is now "suggesting that British nationals currently in Tokyo and to the north of Tokyo should consider leaving the area" because of fears over radiation leaks from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant - where engineers are racing to avert a nuclear catastrophe. Matt Frei will be assessing the mood of the people in the Japanese capital for us tonight, and we'll be joined live by the concert pianist Noriko Ogawa and the actress Haruka Kuroda. Then our Diplomatic editor Mark Urban will be asking why President Barack Obama is taking a back seat over the Libya no-fly zone, and we'll debate with former UK ambassador to the US, Sir Christopher Meyer and former diplomat and journalist, Jamie Rubin. And Iain Watson will report for us on the political dividing lines ahead of the Budget. Gavin Esler will be asking the shadow chancellor Ed Balls if Labour has an alternative strategy.


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2011x51 15/03/2011 (March 15, 2011)


Tonight we're devoting much of the programme to examining the middle class under pressure. For the first time in years this group - who had assumed that if the economy grew their income would grow - are finding this is no longer true. Wages are frozen, and the cost of living is soaring. Tonight our Economics editor Paul Mason reports from Sandwich in Kent where he meets people seeing the value of their wages, homes and pensions eroding and their prospects disappearing. Stephen Smith considers why so many people describe themselves as middle class nowadays. And we'll be joined live by MPs David Willetts and John Denham, and by people from different parts of the income scale - including a single parent who is being made redundant and a couple with two kids who rent their home and live off overdrafts. Plus Susan Watts, our Science editor, will update us on the situation at the Japanese quake-stricken nuclear plant where radiation levels are now at a level harmful to human health.


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2011x50 14/03/2011 (March 14, 2011)


Engineers are racing to cool down a third reactor at a quake-stricken Japanese nuclear plant, after a second blast rocked the facility. Tonight, we ask how severe the nuclear emergency is, and what the implications are for the nuclear sector and energy mix worldwide. We are also examining the impact the earthquake and tsunami is likely to have on the Japanese economy and in turn on the worldwide recovery. Plus, with the pace of events on the ground in Libya outstripping any co-ordinated international response we ask whether this is a tipping point for the diplomatic community. And we have a report from Jeremy Bowen, filmed during his recent days in Tripoli, in which he draws his own conclusions about the uprising and subsequent civil war.


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2011x49 11/03/2011 (March 11, 2011)


Japan's most powerful earthquake since records began has struck the north-east coast, triggering a massive tsunami. Tonight our Science editor Susan Watts will give her assessment of what has happened and why, and ask how well the warning systems worked. Mishal Husain will be speaking to the EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid Kristalina Georgieva about what help we are offering. Meanwhile in Saudi Arabia, hundreds of police were deployed in Riyadh, on the day anti-government rallies were planned. Our correspondent Sue Lloyd Roberts is there and sends us a compelling report on the day's events. Security forces blocked roads and set up checkpoints in an attempt to thwart protests. Protests are illegal in Saudi Arabia, which has had an absolute monarchy since its unification in the 1930s. Read more from Sue in Riyadh by clicking here. And Iain Watston is at the Liberal Democrat spring conference - which is getting under way in Nick Clegg's constituency, Sheffield, just a short distance from Barnsley where the party suffered the humiliation of coming sixth in the recent by-election. We'll be talking to the Liberal Democrat MP Chris Huhne about the state of morale in the party.


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2011x48 10/03/2011 (March 10, 2011)


Unions have reacted angrily to a major report by Lord Hutton proposing a radical overhaul of public sector pensions which would see millions working for longer. David Grossman will be examining the fine print for us tonight. The former business secretary Lord Mandelson will be presenting an authored piece on economic globalisation and will join us live in the studio. Then, as Nato defence ministers meet in Brussels to discuss the possibility of a no-fly zone in Libya, our diplomatic editor Mark Urban will consider if military action of this nature could be considered war in all but name. And Sarfraz Manzoor meets the band Cornershop to talk about their new album - due out next week - which is heavily influenced by Punjabi folk music.


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2011x47 09/03/2011 (March 09, 2011)


The big hitters in government have appeared before the Defence Select Committee today at a time when it is being asked whether defence cuts have left the military without the resources to be effective in Libya and in future crises. We will have some expert analysis from General Sir Richard Dannatt and a full report on what the Defence Secretary Liam Fox and Foreign Secretary William Hague told MPs. We'll also be asking whether growing backbench anger could lead to the defence review being reopened. We also have a report from DR Congo on the child sex trade. Reporter Sam Farmer joins members of the children's parliament in DR Congo as they try to help fellow children who are working in the sex trade. The film centres on the efforts of a 15-year-old boy in the children's parliament who is trying to advocate more rights for these youngsters. Closer to home the government has announced that displaying cigarettes is to be banned in England. But will it stop smoking? We'll look at the evidence and examine how the promotion of cigarettes has changed over the years. And Jeremy will be talking to Jim Davidson live about humour and bigotry. The comedian has written a play about an old racist comedian who is challenged by a young black performer.


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2011x46 08/03/2011 (March 08, 2011)


What are the options for western intervention over Libya? Should we arm the rebels? The idea is being considered by the White House but how realistic is it and how tricky politically? Tonight we'll look at the options for western governments and their possible outcomes. We are hoping to speak to the former Republican presidential candidate Senator John McCain to get his views. We will also consider what is behind these questions in the Middle East and North Africa with the American linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky. How do the recent events affect Chomsky's world view? You can see a preview of the interview here. The government has been criticised over its handling of the crisis in Libya, most notably over getting Briton's out. But there have been other perceived gaffes too raising questions over the government's competence. Remember the U turn over the sale of forests? We'll get the latest take on the how well the government is doing with its presentation skills from some politically savvy guests. And we'll be asking - why is sectarianism still so strong in Glasgow? A summit was held in Edinburgh today chaired by First Minister Alex Salmond following last week's Old Firm Scottish Cup replay which saw three red cards, several touch-line and tunnel confrontations and 34 arrests inside Celtic Park. Why has antipathy between Protestants and Catholics survived for so long in the city?


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2011x45 07/03/2011 (March 07, 2011)


Tonight we have an amazing film from Jackie Long about Sarah Palin. Jackie has been to Alaska and got more than just a quick doorstep interview with the woman herself. She tells us how she is weighing up whether the US is ready for an "unconventional" presidential candidate like her. We also talk to Sarah Palin's parents who are concerned their daughter might be assassinated. David Cameron promised "the most pro-growth budget this country has seen for a generation" in his speech at the weekend, but what are the prospects for the British economy and what are the chances of real growth? We'll be hearing from our economics editor Paul Mason. Read Paul's blog. And Prince Andrew remains under pressure over his friendship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, an American financier. Michael Crick has been following the Prince around today and will bring us up to date tonight.


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2011x44 04/03/2011 (March 04, 2011)


Mishal Husain is presenting tonight and she's been speaking exclusively to Nato Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen about how his organisation plans to respond to events in Libya. Meanwhile Lyse Doucet - who is in the country - will be asking Libyans what intervention they expect from the West. Then we'll be hearing from our Political editor Michael Crick who has been meeting people living in rural areas to ask them how rising fuel prices are affecting their lives. And Liz Mackean has had exclusive access to a report which has found that many local authorities will not be guaranteeing funding and will be cutting services for victims of domestic violence from the end of this month. Should local authorities be the sole providers of these services? We'll debate.


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2011x43 03/03/2011 (March 03, 2011)


Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has been given government approval for its controversial bid to take over BSkyB. The green light follows News Corp's offer to spin off Sky News as an independent company. Rival media groups dismissed News Corp's offer as a "whitewash" and said they would "vigorously contest" it. We will be examining the decision and speaking to the man who made it, Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt. Lyse Doucet will bring us the latest on what is happening in Libya. Tim Whewell has a film on Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood - who they are and what they stand for. And we ask whether, despite all of the fanfare accompanying Saturday's World Book Night plan to give away one million books, there are any problems with a great book giveaway.


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2011x42 02/03/2011 (March 02, 2011)


Forces loyal to Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi have moved into eastern areas for the first time since towns there fell to protesters two weeks ago, with reports of heavy fighting between them and anti-Gaddafi rebels in the oil town of Brega, 100 miles south of the rebel stronghold of Benghazi. Earlier Col Gaddafi said on TV he would "fight until the last man and woman" and warned that thousands of Libyans would die if Western forces intervened. Tonight, as we will have the latest on the Gaddafi fight back from Lyse Doucet in Benghazi and Tim Whewell will be assessing whether there is any sign of a joined up global response to the crisis. Michael Crick is Barnsley ahead of tomorrow's by-election finding out what matters most to voters there. Also, more than 600 Oxbridge academics are demanding a halt to the £9,000 tuition fee rise, saying they have had no time to work out how it will be implemented. Universities Minister David Willetts and one of those critics will go head to head on the programme tonight.


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2011x41 01/03/2011 (March 01, 2011)


John Galliano's anti-Semitic remarks could have turned into a full scale diplomatic crisis. Why? Because, as any fashionista knows, Dior - who he designs for - is the label worn by one Mrs Sarkozy. Carla Bruni started life as a Dior model and has remained loyal to the house ever since. As things turned out, Dior was not prepared to see a YouTube video start a new war in the Middle East. They sacked Galliano earlier today. And the first lady of France is now free to wear Dior again. Anyway, I write that in passing because there are, as you know, currently more pressing diplomatic affairs at hand. Tonight, Niall Ferguson, author of Civilization, will help us examine the role of the West in the revolution in the Arab world - and explain what history can tell us about why certain cultures appear to dominate the world at certain times. We'll also be asking whether the government's done enough in its adjustment to the international development aid budget to allay criticism that we are funnelling money into dodgy dictatorships and into countries that are economically far more successful than we are. Plus, the European Court of Justice has declared it is discriminatory to charge women less than men for their car insurance. Women are better drivers. Men die younger. What's wrong with discrimination within the free market?




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