Manor House Season 1

Season 1

Manor House Season 1

First Air Date: April 28, 2003

First Aired on    :   2003
Episodes    :   6 episodes



Episodes

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1x06 Winners and Losers (April 30, 2003)


In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo. Germany declared war on Russia and France. Britain declares war on Germany when it violates Belgian neutrality. In the first 18 months of war, 2.4 million men signed up voluntarily. A quarter of the men of fighting age volunteered in England and Wales. Fighting continued on the Western Front until 11 a.m. on November 11th, 1918. By that time, 772,000 British were killed and 1,676,037 were wounded. The latter-day Edwardians prepare to leave the past behind them. In the final episode, the family and the servants enjoy a day at the races, ""the sport of kings,"" and, back at Manderston, they reflect on their personal experiences and discuss a bygone era they have come to know so well. A servants' ball is held downstairs and the family is invited. Chef Dubiard is holding a grudge because the Olliff-Coopers haven't been eating the Edwardian culinary delights he's been cooking for them. He refus


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1x05 Days of Empire (aka Home and Empire) (April 30, 2003)


Homes like Manderston were built on the spoils of the British Empire and the international markets produced by aggressive colonialism. Their owners were men who became so rich and so successful that they saw the world as their oyster and the British people as superior. In 1911, George V was crowned Emperor of India at a Durbar, a gathering of princes, in Delhi. That year also marked the beginning of a period of industrial unrest in Great Britain. In 1912, the Titanic sank after hitting an iceberg, an event that some believe marked the beginning of the end of Edwardian glamour and excess. In episode five, events are being organized at Manderston to celebrate the British Empire's colonial prowess and success. But for the disgruntled tutor, Mr. Raj-Singh, Britain's Imperial past is a sore point. He is invited to organize a special evening of dinner and entertainment hosted by Sir John and attended by the real-life Prince Moshin Ali-Khan, but manages only to alienate himself further by ins


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1x04 Tough Love (aka Cold Comfort) (April 29, 2003)


Events like weekend shooting parties were among the most extravagant of the era. King Edward VII had set the standard for the behavior of the aristocracy at such events, which were strictly private and often involved extra-marital affairs. But by 1910, the party — at least for King Edward — was over. He died in May and was succeeded by George V. Sir John decides to host a weekend shooting party. Miss Anson, Lady Olliff-Cooper's unmarried sister, is finding her life unbearably repressive, and rebels by indulging in such ""manly"" pastimes as riding her bike and going out walking on her own. By the end of episode four, Miss Anson leaves the house on doctor's orders, taking a break from the Edwardian experience. When Sir John criticizes the food in front of guests, the chef, Monsieur Dubiard, takes revenge and prepares a grand dish in the authentic Edwardian style — a pig's head — which is carried into the dining room and sliced before the horrified eyes of the family. Most of the servants


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1x03 The Servants Revolt (April 29, 2003)


At the height of Edwardian opulence, a battle was brewing that eventually would transform the British political landscape. The Clarion, a political paper, published articles written from a socialist perspective. It also championed the right to leisure for the working classes — a key issue in a society where industrialization had replaced seasonal and weather-dependent work with unremitting labor for the masses. The newspaper spawned a network of social clubs for working men and women. In this episode, the staff crisis comes to a head. One of the maids is sick and the other servants bitterly complain about the family — and even about Morrison, the lady's maid — and demand better working conditions. The chef breaches etiquette and convinces Lady Olliff-Cooper and her sister, Miss Anson, to see the working conditions downstairs for the first time. Lady Olliff-Cooper also pays a visit to a local hospital, mirroring the tradition of philanthropic, upper-class women of the period. After five


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1x02 Making the Grade (aka Up to Scratch) (April 28, 2003)


At a time when industrial and commercial wealth was being welcomed into the ranks of high society, proper etiquette was crucial for a nouveau riche family like the Olliff-Coopers to hold and improve their position at the top. In episode two, the Olliff-Coopers are upstairs settling into a lifestyle of wealth and privilege, making plans for their first dinner party according to complicated protocols covering everything from the seating arrangement to the wines. Downstairs, the staff is grumbling, particularly Kelly Squires, the new scullery maid. They try a modern management solution, unthinkable in Edwardian times, whereby jobs are swapped for one day. Charlie, the first footman, becomes the scullery maid, and Kelly takes over Kenny's duties as hallboy, while he steps into the role of first footman. On the day of the big dinner party, Mr. Edgar, the butler, finds Charlie and Kenny passed out by the lake on the estate grounds, recovering from a night of excessive partying. Nevertheless,


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1x01 Upstairs Downstairs (April 28, 2003)


In the early 20th century, during the reign of Edward VII and several years beyond, Britain was home to some of the richest people in the world. Edward VII's appetite for frivolity paved the way for men of commerce and industry to flaunt their wealth. With its marble hall, its silver-plated main staircase and its heated stables, Manderston — the country estate that serves as the setting for MANOR HOUSE — is testimony to the nouveau riche Edwardian tastes of the era. But at the same time, the general public was getting restless for social change. The women's suffrage movement was gaining momentum, and liberal politicians were winning elections. Talk about having your work cut out for you! The series begins downstairs at Manderston, a 109-room Edwardian mansion in Scotland, where Hugh Edgar, architect cum butler, and Jean Davies, grandmother cum housekeeper, organize the junior staff: first footman Charlie Clay, second footman Rob Daly, hallboy Kenny Skelton, groom Tristan Aldrich, kitch